July 1

8 results found

“Praise the Lord! Sing to the Lord a new song. Sing his praises in the assembly of the faithful” (Psalm 149:1 NLT).

From: July 1, 2019

WHY SING A NEW SONG TO THE LORD?

The Scripture often instructs that a “new song” be sung to the Lord? In fact, this is in the Bible a total of nine times: six in the Psalms, once in Isaiah, and twice in Revelation. So, why does the Lord desire a new song from his people?
 
Perhaps it’s because we naturally prefer “old songs.” We love to sing songs that we have sung since childhood. Yet, when these old songs were written they were actually new songs to that generation, describing new mercies and new thanks to the Lord for the people of that day. There’s nothing wrong with old songs.
 
There isn’t a biblical prohibition against singing old songs. It’s just that God is always doing a new thing. And every generation is called to experience God’s grace and mercy for themselves. This rightly results in new songs.
 
So, let’s sing the old songs of God’s grace and mercy, but lets not forget to write and sing new songs too!
 
PRAYER: Lord, thank You that Your mercies are new everyday. You put a new song on our lips. Help us to sing to You in the assembly of the faithful, surrounded by the voices of our fellow believers and echoing with the angelic voices in the heavenliness. Lord, we want to sing a new song to You because You are new to us everyday. In Jesus’ name, amen.

“We went ashore, found the local believers, and stayed with them a week” (Acts 21:4 NLT).

From: July 1, 2018

LOCAL BELIEVERS AT EVERY PORT
Paul and Luke went ashore at Tyre while the ship was unloaded of its cargo. They stayed with local believers there for a week. How things had changed since Paul’s first missionary journey. On his first expedition, no one had even heard the gospel. Now, as he returned to Jerusalem after his third missionary tour, believers met him at nearly every stop. Christianity was spreading like wildfire!
 
But Paul’s work was not yet finished. Even though fellow believers warned him not to go, Paul was determined to return to Jerusalem and ultimately, to travel to Rome to preach the gospel. His calling was not only to the Jews and Gentiles, but also to kings (See Acts 9:15). So, to Caesar he was determined to go.

“On the next day we who were Paul’s companions departed and came to Caesarea, and entered the house of Philip the evangelist, who was one of the seven, and stayed with him” (Acts 21:8 NKJV).

From: July 1, 2017

Luke the physician and the traveling companion of Paul, gave detail of their arrival in Caesarea and their lodging at the house of Philip, one of the seven original deacons. This was Caesarea Maritima (not to be confused with Caesarea Philippi), which was built by Herod the Great and named after his patron, Caesar Augustus. Paul had come and gone out to sea many times from this amazing man-made harbor, but this would be the last time that he did so as a free man. The next time he would appear in Caesarea it would be in chains, just as the prophet Agabus had warned.
 
At Caesarea, he would appeal to Caesar as he stood before the Roman governor, Festus, and Herod Agrippa. At Caesarea, he would make his defense, so that Agrippa replied, “Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian” (Acts 26:28). At Caesarea, Paul would depart for Rome, never to see Jerusalem again. Yet, he was willing to give his life to carry the gospel to the center of the Roman world.

“Hezekiah received the letter from the hand of the messengers and read it; and Hezekiah went up to the house of the Lord and spread it before the Lord” (2 Kings 19:14 ESV)

From: July 1, 2016

When King Hezekiah of Judah received a letter from the king of Assyria threatening to overthrow Jerusalem and mocking his dependence on the Lord, the king carried the letter into the Temple. He fell on his face in prayer and spread the letter out on the floor for the Lord’s consideration. The Lord heard Hezekiah’s prayer and defended Jerusalem, so that the Assyrian army retreated without firing a shot. What threatens you today? Have you “spread” it out before the Lord in prayer?

“For I will defend this city, to save it for My own sake and for My servant David’s sake” (2 Kings 19:34 NKJV)

From: July 1, 2015

After the Assyrians had overthrown the Northern Kingdom of Israel, they set their sights on the Southern Kingdom of Judah. But as their armies gathered outside the city of Jerusalem, they overplayed their hand by belittling the name of God in their threats. So, God heard the prayer of King Hezekiah of Judah and delivered Jerusalem untouched from Assyrian hands. God did this for the sake of His own Name and for the sake of the remnant within Jerusalem who still honored Him.
Is there a remnant who still honor God’s Name in your city today?

“After Hezekiah received the letter from the messengers and read it, he went up to the Lord’s Temple and spread it out before the Lord” (2 Kings 19:14 NLT)

From: July 1, 2014

When King Hezekiah of Judah received a letter from the king of Assyria threatening to overthrow Jerusalem and mocking his dependence on the Lord, the king carried the letter into the Temple. He fell on his face in prayer and spread the letter out on the floor for the Lord’s consideration. The Lord heard Hezekiah’s prayer and defended Jerusalem, so that the Assyrian army retreated without firing a shot. What threatens you today? Have you “spread” it out before the Lord in prayer?