July 2

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“After greeting them, Paul gave a detailed account of the things God had accomplished among the Gentiles through his ministry” (Acts 21:19 NLT).

From: July 2, 2018

PAUL’S MISSIONS REPORT AT JERUSALEM
This was a wonderful day in the history of the early church. Paul returned from his third and longest missionary journey to give “a detailed account” to James and the elders in Jerusalem. After hearing the report of how the Gentiles all over Asia Minor and Greece had received the gospel, the elders rejoiced and praised God.
 
The modern practice of giving a missions report back to the home church is really not modern at all. I suppose the first missions team to report back was the “Seventy-two” sent out by Jesus who “returned with joy” (Luke 10:17). Yet, Paul and his team certainly solidified the practice of bringing back a detailed report to the sending church.
 
In only a few weeks, we’ll be sending out our Guatemala Missions Team. And we look forward with hope to rejoicing and praising God at their missions report when they return.

“On the following day Paul went in with us to James, and all the elders were present. When he had greeted them, he told in detail those things which God had done among the Gentiles through his ministry. And when they heard it, they glorified the Lord” (Acts 21:18-20 NKJV).

From: July 2, 2017

The apostle Paul reported to James, the half-brother of Jesus (Gal. 1:19), and the Christian elders in Jerusalem concerning his missionary work among the Gentiles. They gave glory to the Lord when they heard his report. Yet, they also encouraged him to take steps to reconcile himself to the Jewish believers in Jerusalem by showing that he “walked orderly and kept the law” (Acts 21:25).
 
Paul submitted to the advice of James and the elders. Unfortunately, it was in the following of their advice that he was falsely accused by the mob and nearly beaten to death before being arrested by the commander of the Roman garrison.
 
Some would say that it was the following of the advice of James and the elders that led to Paul’s arrest. But Paul knew better. He knew that it was the Lord who guided his steps and determined his path. He knew that the Lord had sent him on an all-expense-paid trip to Rome to preach the gospel before Caesar.

“The rest of the deeds of Hezekiah and all his might and how he made the pool and the conduit and brought water into the city, are they not written in the Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Judah?” (2 Kings 20:20 ESV)

From: July 2, 2016

King Hezekiah was one of the greatest kings in Judah. In 2 Kings 18:5, he was described as one who “trusted in the Lord God of Israel, so that after him was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor who were before him.” The only foolish event attributed to his reign happened near its end, as he invited emissaries from Babylon to see all of the wealth within Jerusalem, thus foreshadowing Babylon’s future overthrow of the city. Yet, despite this prideful lapse in judgment, Hezekiah remains one of the greatest kings to sit on David’s throne. Evidence of his reign still remains today, as the water still flows through Hezekiah’s tunnel into Jerusalem. My wife, Robin and I have waded through this manmade tunnel which attests to ancient man’s genius and to the credibility of the Bible which describes its existence.

“Now the rest of the acts of Hezekiah—all his might, and how he made a pool and a tunnel and brought water into the city—are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah?” (2 Kings 20:20 NKJV)

From: July 2, 2015

King Hezekiah was one of the greatest kings in Judah. In 2 Kings 18:5, he was described as one who “trusted in the Lord God of Israel, so that after him was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor who were before him.” The only foolish event attributed to his reign happened near its end, as he invited emissaries from Babylon to see all of the wealth within Jerusalem, thus foreshadowing Babylon’s future overthrow of the city. Yet, despite this prideful lapse in judgment, Hezekiah remains one of the greatest kings to sit on David’s throne. Evidence of his reign still remains today, as the water still flows through Hezekiah’s tunnel into Jerusalem. My wife, Robin and I have waded through this manmade tunnel which attests to ancient man’s genius and to the credibility of the Bible which describes its existence.

“The name of the Lord is a strong fortress; the godly run to him and are safe” (Proverbs 18:10 NLT)

From: July 2, 2014

As a father and grandfather, some special urge emerges within me when one of my children use the name “Daddy” or “Pawpaw.” When my grandson, Nate says, “Pawpaw, can you play Power Rangers with me?” It’s the name he calls me that moves me more than his request. I have no interest in being the red, blue or yellow Power Ranger, but I am moved to be Nate’s “Pawpaw.” Yet, not everyone can use my name in this way. Only my children and grandchildren have this right and influence with me. Perhaps this is a small insight into how God responds when we invoke His Name. We are His children and when we call upon His Name, He responds. As Jesus said, “If you ask me anything in my name, I will do it” (John 14:14).