February 11

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“As my glorious presence passes by, I will hide you in the crevice of the rock and cover you with my hand until I have passed by” (Exodus 33:22 NLT).

From: February 11, 2019

ROCK OF AGES

God agreed to show Moses His glory, but had to hide him in the cleft of a rock so he wouldn’t die. Whenever I read this passage, I always find myself singing, “Rock of Ages, cleft for me. Let me hide myself in Thee.” Whatever Moses saw, it must have been amazing because even those who saw Moses’ face later were struck with awe and fear. The mere residual reflection of God’s glory on Moses’ face was so awesome that he had to wear a veil.
 
PRAYER: Dear Lord, like Moses we would ask to see Your glory manifest in our lives. We know that Jesus is the supreme revelation of Your glory to us. Yet, we would have more of Him reflected in us. As we begin this day, let others see Jesus in us. As we with “unveiled faces” (2 Cor. 3:18) consider the ever-increasing glory that awaits those who will spend eternity with You. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

“But Moses tried to pacify the Lord his God” (Exodus 32:11 NLT).

From: February 11, 2018

MOSES THE INTERCESSOR
When the people sinned with the golden calf, God threatened to destroy them and start over with Moses. But Moses interceded, not according to the people’s worthiness, but according to God’s covenant and God’s reputation. Moses remained and interceded even though God had asked him to “leave him alone” to let His anger blaze against the people. Moses took God’s instruction to leave as an invitation to stay and intercede. Like Abraham who interceded for Sodom, Moses interceded for the Israelites and God relented.

“…but his servant Joshua the son of Nun, a young man, did not depart from the tabernacle” (Exodus 33:11 NKJV).

From: February 11, 2017

After Israel’s idolatry over the golden calf, Moses set his tent outside the camp and called it the “tabernacle of meeting.” There, Moses would meet with God. The pillar of cloud would descend and stand at the tabernacle door, and the Lord would speak to Moses. Moses would come and go between the Israelite camp and the tabernacle, but Joshua “did not depart from the tabernacle.” Notice the detail given concerning Joshua:
 
1) His name – “Joshua,” in Hebrew is יְהוֹשׁ֫וּעַ, or “Yehoshua,” which means, “the LORD is salvation.” This is the same name given to Christ (From the Greek Ιησούς, iesous or “Jesus”).
2) Moses’ servant – While the rest of Israel, including Moses’ own brother, Aaron, committed idolatry, Joshua remained a humble and faithful servant to Moses. In like manner, Jesus was a humble and faithful servant to His Father.
3) Son of Nun – Joshua, son of Nun, was from the tribe of Ephraim (Num. 13:8), which was the son of Joseph. Joshua descended from the half tribe of Joseph. And Jesus was known as the legal descendent of one named Joseph.
4) Young man – Joshua was much younger than Moses. Moses was at the time in his 80s, while Joshua was probably in his 50s. This makes me feel better about my age. The Bible says that the 50s is young! I like that! Jesus was a young man in his 30s when He fulfilled His ministry.
5) Did not depart – Joshua stayed at the tabernacle continually. The Scripture doesn’t comment on his activity there, but it must have involved serving Moses and perhaps guarding access. Jesus was also known for not departing from the Temple. Even as a 12 year old boy, his parents found him there talking with the teachers (Luke 2:41-51).
 
Moses was the lawgiver of Israel who was unable to give them rest (salvation); that honor was given to Joshua, who brought Israel into the Promised Land after Moses died. Similarly, Jesus, the Son of God, has accomplished that which the law could not do, namely, salvation for all those who believe (Rom. 8:3-4). And now, He never departs from the presence of the Father, always interceding for us (Heb. 7:24-25).

“But when he was accused by the chief priests and elders, he gave no answer” (Matthew 27:12 ESV)

From: February 11, 2016

Fulfilling the Messianic prophecy of Isaiah, Jesus was silent before his accusers: “He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth; like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent, so he opened not his mouth” (Isa.53:7). Every time I read the story of Christ’s trial and crucifixion, my mind screams against the injustice. I hear myself saying, “Speak up Lord. Don’t let them falsely accuse you.” But then I remember. He did this for me. He stood before a human judge and was condemned to death. Jesus, the Son of God, went silently “like a lamb that is led to the slaughter” for me.
The One who spoke the universe into existence was silent. He was condemned in our place, so that there is now “no condemnation” for those who are in Him (Rom.8:1).

“Sing to Him a new song; Play skillfully with a shout of joy” (Psalm 33:3 NKJV)

From: February 11, 2015

I love the old hymns. Hymns like “Amazing Grace,” written in 1779 by John Newton and later joined with the tune “New Britain” in a hymnbook published in 1847. Yet, I also love to sing a new song written by a new generation of believers. As a generation gets older it is easy to reject anything new. We cling to that which moved us when we were young. But I especially love when modern artists combine the old and new, like Chris Tomlin’s version of “Amazing Grace (My Chains Are Gone).” Tomlin “skillfully” brought the old song into the present giving it new life. We have to be careful not to worship the old songs, rather than the Lord of which they were written to praise. Our goal should be to “sing to Him” and to “play skillfully” to Him. Every culture and generation should yearn to sing new songs and to play them with excellence because our Lord is the One who inspires our worship.

“The Lord frustrates the plans of the nations and thwarts all their schemes. But the Lord’s plans stand firm forever; his intentions can never be shaken” (Psalm 33:10-11 NLT)

From: February 11, 2014

The Psalmist reminds us of the sovereignty of God and the power of His plans. We may feel overwhelmed and troubled by the politics and plans of nations, including our own government. Yet, we can call on the One who is able to “frustrate” the schemes of kings. This is not to say that we should not be involved in making plans or attempting to influence our leaders, but it reminds us not to despair, for God is on His throne and this world is not our home. It reminds us to fear God and not men.

“While my glory passes by I will put you in a cleft of the rock, and I will cover you with my hand until I have passed by” (Exodus 33:22 ESV)

From: February 11, 2013

God agreed to show Moses His glory, but had to hide him in the cleft of a rock so he wouldn’t die. Whenever I read this passage, I always find myself singing, “Rock of Ages, cleft for me. Let me hide myself in Thee.” Whatever Moses saw, it must have been amazing because even those who saw Moses’ face later were struck with awe and fear. The mere residual reflection of God’s glory on Moses’ face was so terrible that he had to wear a veil.