Micah

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“But you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, are only a small village among all the people of Judah. Yet a ruler of Israel, whose origins are in the distant past, will come from you on my behalf” (Micah 5:2 NLT).

December 16, 2018

BETHLEHEM, CHRIST’S PROPHESIED BIRTHPLACE
In the midst of Micah’s prophecy for Israel’s judgment, the Spirit revealed the future birthplace of the Messiah. This is the prophecy that the priests and scribes quoted to King Herod when the Magi came seeking the one born king of the Jews.

Bethlehem was also called the “Town of David,” as it was King David’s birthplace. How fitting that the “ruler of Israel,” the Son of David, would be born there too. The name Bethlehem means “house of bread” (Hebrew: “Beth” – “house,” + “lechem” – “bread”). How appropriate that the “Bread of Heaven” would be born in the “House of Bread.” This small town was also known for the quality of its sheep and because of its close proximity to Jerusalem, it became one of the main sources of passover lambs that were sold for sacrifice in the Temple. How shocking, yet how wondrous that this One “whose origins are in the distant past” would be the Lamb of God born in a Bethlehem stable.

Indeed, the Christ was born in little Bethlehem, far from the wealthy cities of the world and welcomed by humble shepherds. God revealed His birthplace to Micah over 700 years before He came. Jesus fulfilled over 300 messianic prophecies, yet the majority of His own people rejected Him. What will you do with Christ this Christmas?

“But you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are too little to be among the clans of Judah, from you shall come forth for me one who is to be ruler in Israel, whose coming forth is from of old,
from ancient days.” (Micah 5:2 ESV)

December 16, 2016

Written 700 years before Christ was born, this prophecy correctly predicted that the birth of the Messiah would be in the tiny town of Bethlehem. Bethlehem was also called the “Town of David,” as it was King David’s birthplace. How fitting that the “One to be Ruler in Israel,” the Son of David, would be born there too. The name Bethlehem means “house of bread” (Hebrew: “Beth” – “house,” + “lechem” – “bread”). How appropriate that the “Bread of Heaven” would be born in the “House of Bread.” This small town was also known for the quality of its sheep and because of its close proximity to Jerusalem, it became one of the main sources of passover lambs that were sold for sacrifice in the Temple. How shocking, yet how wondrous that this One “whose coming forth is from of old, from ancient days” would be the Lamb of God born in a Bethlehem stable.

“And you, O tower of the flock, hill of the daughter of Zion, to you shall it come, the former dominion shall come, kingship for the daughter of Jerusalem” (Micah 4:8 ESV)

December 15, 2016

Micah prophesied that “kingship” would come to a “hill” where stood the “tower of the flock.” This prophecy points to the birth of the Messiah, Jesus Christ. In the Hebrew, the phrase “tower of the flock” is “Migdal Edar.” It described both a tower and a place. It would have been a two-story stone watchtower that the shepherds used to keep watch over their flocks. And “Migdal Edar” also described a place near Bethlehem on the road to Jerusalem (Gen.35:19-21). The tower would have been on a “hill” to enlarge the shepherd’s view from the top story. The bottom story was used as a stable for newborn lambs. The shepherds of Bethlehem were known for raising sacrificial lambs to sell to the Temple in Jerusalem. It was to these shepherds at “Migdal Edar” that Micah prophesied the Messiah, the Lamb of God, would come. And so He did.

“But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, Though you are little among the thousands of Judah, Yet out of you shall come forth to Me The One to be Ruler in Israel,
Whose goings forth are from of old,
From everlasting” (Micah 5:2 NKJV)

December 16, 2015

Written 700 years before Christ was born, this prophecy correctly predicted that the birth of the Messiah would be in the tiny town of Bethlehem. Bethlehem was also called the “Town of David,” as it was King David’s birthplace. How fitting that the “One to be Ruler in Israel,” the Son of David, would be born there too. The name Bethlehem means “house of bread” (Hebrew: “Beth” – “house,” + “lechem” – “bread”). How appropriate that the “Bread of Heaven” would be born in the “House of Bread.” This small town was also known for the quality of its sheep and because of its close proximity to Jerusalem, it became one of the main sources of passover lambs that were sold for sacrifice in the Temple. How shocking, yet how wondrous that this One “whose goings forth are from everlasting” would be the Lamb of God born in a Bethlehem stable.

“But you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, are only a small village among all the people of Judah. Yet a ruler of Israel, whose origins are in the distant past, will come from you on my behalf” (Micah 5:2 NLT)

December 16, 2014

In the midst of Micah’s prophecy for Israel’s judgment, the Spirit revealed the future birthplace of the Messiah. This is the prophecy that the Scribes quoted to King Herod when the Magi inquired about it. Indeed, the Christ was born in little Bethlehem, far from the wealthy cities of the world and welcomed by humble shepherds. God revealed His birthplace to Micah over 700 years before He came. Jesus fulfilled over 300 messianic prophecies, yet His own people rejected Him. What will you do with Christ this Christmas?

“But you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are too little to be among the clans of Judah, from you shall come forth for me one who is to be ruler in Israel, whose coming forth is from of old, from ancient days” (Micah 5:2)

December 16, 2013

This prophecy from Micah is the one that Herod’s chief priests and scribes reported when the Magi visited inquiring about the one born king of the Jews (Matthew 2:1). Micah wrote this prophecy 700 years before Christ’s birth. Bethlehem (“house of bread”) Ephrathah (“fruitful”) was the town of David’s birth and therefore an appropriate place for one born to the line of David to be born. Yet, it would be presumptuous for the prophet to assume that a future heir would be born in the same town. David’s many other sons certainly weren’t born there. No, this was not speculation on Micah’s part. It was the very Word of God that Micah spoke when he prophesied little Bethlehem’s future “starring” role.

“He shall judge between many peoples, and shall decide for strong nations far away; and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore” (Micah 4:3)

December 15, 2013

After three chapters of judgment, God spoke of a future day when the nations would “study war no more.” But this peace cannot precede judgment. Otherwise, the seeds of the next war would be contained therein. Many asked Micah to stop preaching such stuff. Too negative. But Micah replied with the word of the Lord, “Do not my words do good to him who walks uprightly?” In other words, the one who “walks uprightly” understands that real peace is more than the cessation of hostilities. It is the changing of the human heart that comes only through the Lord, that fills everyone with love and forgiveness.

“But you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, are only a small village among all the people of Judah. Yet a ruler of Israel will come from you, one whose origins are from the distant past” (Micah 5:2)

December 16, 2012

This is one of 300 Old Testament prophecies that were fulfilled by Christ. Among them are those surrounding His birth: the star, born in Bethlehem, Son of God, virgin birth, line of David, out of Egypt, and even the execution of Rachel’s children. This is the Christmas story. It’s not just the angels, shepherds and wisemen. It’s also the worldly king Herod and the evil in mankind that would murder children. This is why Jesus came. He came to die for our sins, so that we could be set free from this death sentence.

“Oh, people of Judah, shave your heads in sorrow, for the children you love will be snatched away” (Micah 1:16)

December 15, 2012

The prophet Micah foretold a day when Judah would fall to Babylon and their children would be taken. Evil always targets the innocent. Didn’t the worldly king Herod kill all those under two years in Bethlehem, trying to kill Jesus? What happened in Newton, CT yesterday reminds us that evil is real and that humanity is fallen and that Jesus is our only hope of redemption.