May 31

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“When Ahithophel realized that his advice had not been followed, he saddled his donkey, went to his hometown, set his affairs in order, and hanged himself” (2 Samuel 17:23 NLT).

From: May 31, 2019

THE FIRST JUDAS

The story of David’s betrayal by Ahithophel foreshadows that of Jesus by Judas. David wept on the Mount of Olives as he left Jerusalem, as Jesus did on the night of his betrayal. David was betrayed by a trusted advisor, who later hung himself. Jesus was betrayed by one of his own disciples, who also hung himself.
 
Yet, God protected David from betrayal and restored him to the throne. But “His own Son He did not spare, but delivered Him up for us all” (Rom. 8:32).
 
The Old Testament prepares us for the Jesus story, which is the gospel story. Yet, only those with eyes to see and ears to hear will believe.
 
PRAYER: Dear Father, thank You for Jesus. Thank You for the whole of Scripture which points to Him on every page. May we also point to Jesus with every effort, word and deed of our lives. Give us grace for this day. In Jesus’ name, amen.

“But one of the soldiers pierced His side with a spear, and immediately blood and water came out” (John 19:34 NKJV).

From: May 31, 2017

The apostle John, who was the only disciple near the cross when Jesus was crucified, was also the only gospel writer who reported these final details of Christ’s death. Perhaps John made sure to include his eyewitness testimony of the grisly details because of the Gnostic heresy that was already at large by the time of John’s writing.
 
The Gnostics (From the Greek word gnōsis, meaning “knowledge”) believed that they had obtained mystical or secret knowledge of the divine. They saw the material world as inherently evil and only the spiritual as good. Therefore, they rejected the idea that Jesus had actually come in the flesh. And as a result, they rejected that Jesus had truly died on the cross. In their view, “it only appeared” as if Jesus had died (The Gnostic heresy clearly affected Islam’s view of the crucifixion as the Quran uses an almost identical description).
 
John’s gospel was especially concerned with reporting the diligence of the Roman executioners in confirming Christ’s physical death. He reported the soldier’s spear piercing Christ’s side and the mixture of “blood and water” pouring out. Although John had no awareness of modern medical knowledge, physicians today have noted that a piercing of the pericardium, the fluid-filled membrane surrounding the heart, would’ve resulted in the sight that John witnessed. The blood and water was a sure sign of Christ’s death.
 
John followed his reporting of the blood and water with a strong declaration that reminds one of a courtroom witness taking an oath to speak the truth. He said, “And he who has seen has testified, and his testimony is true; and he knows that he is telling the truth, so that you may believe” (John 19:35).
 
John wanted to make sure that everyone knew that he had witnessed Christ’s physical death. For if Jesus didn’t die, there would be no redemption, no payment for our sin. And if Jesus didn’t die, there would be no need for his resurrection.
 
But Jesus did die and He was raised. That is the truth that John reported. And that is the truth that we believe.

‘When Jesus had received the sour wine, he said, “It is finished,” and he bowed his head and gave up his spirit’ (John 19:30 ESV)

From: May 31, 2016

The final words of Jesus on the cross were not words of defeat, but of ultimate victory. He shouted, “It is finished!” His last words expressed exultation at accomplishing the task He had come to complete. In the Greek, it is one word: Τετέλεσται (Tetelestai), which is in the perfect tense. The basic thought of the perfect tense is that the progress of an action has been completed and the results of the action are continuing on, in full effect. In other words, the progress of the action has reached its culmination and the finished results are now in existence. It might also be translated: “fulfilled, accomplished, paid-in-full.” Essentially, Jesus, with this one word, “tetelestai,” announced that He had accomplished His God-given mission, fulfilling every prophetic detail, and paid-in-full the price for our sins, so that we might be forgiven and receive eternal life. His salvation work is complete and its finished results are even now in existence for those who would believe on Him.

‘So when Jesus had received the sour wine, He said, “It is finished!” And bowing His head, He gave up His spirit’ (John 19:30 NKJV)

From: May 31, 2015

The final words of Jesus on the cross were not words of defeat, but of ultimate victory. He shouted, “It is finished!” His last words expressing exultation at accomplishing the task He had come to complete. In the Greek, it is one word: Τετέλεσται (Tetelestai), which is in the perfect tense. The basic thought of the perfect tense is that the progress of an action has been completed and the results of the action are continuing on, in full effect. In other words, the progress of the action has reached its culmination and the finished results are now in existence. It might also be translated: “fulfilled, accomplished, paid-in-full.” Essentially, Jesus, with this one word, “tetelestai,” announced that He had accomplished His God-given mission, fulfilling every prophetic detail, and paid-in-full the price for our sins, so that we might be forgiven and receive eternal life. His salvation work is complete and its finished results are even now in existence for those who would believe on Him.

“When Ahithophel realized that his advice had not been followed, he saddled his donkey, went to his hometown, set his affairs in order, and hanged himself” (2 Samuel 17:23 NLT)

From: May 31, 2014

The story of David’s betrayal foreshadows that of Jesus. David wept on the Mount of Olives as he left Jerusalem. He was betrayed by a trusted advisor. And his advisor later hung himself. The Old Testament prepares us for the Jesus story, which is the gospel story. Yet, only those with eyes to see and ears to hear will believe.