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May 30

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‘Then Jesus came out, wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe. And Pilate said to them, “Behold the Man!”’ (John 19:5 NKJV).

From: May 30, 2020

BEHOLD THE MAN!

The Roman governor of Judea, Pontius Pilate, brought Jesus out to stand before the accusing crowd. He had been scourged, beaten, mocked, and spit upon. A crown of thorns was pressed down upon his bruised brow and a purple robe thrown across his torn and bleeding shoulders. He stood silently before his accusers.
 
“Behold the man!” shouted Pilate, no doubt hoping to provoke pity from the multitude. In other words, “Look at him! He’s no threat to anyone. He probably won’t even survive the beating we just gave him. We’ve made him a laughing stock, a dead man walking. He’s no threat to Rome nor to you. I find no fault in him.”
 
Yet the crowd shouted, “Crucify him!” So he was crucified on a hill in Jerusalem called Golgotha, between two thieves.
 
Have you looked upon this man? Have you given him careful consideration? Have you truly beheld this man, Jesus? For although John quotes Pilate, he surely invites us to stand in the crowd and “behold the man” too.
 
John began his gospel “in the beginning,” declaring Christ as the Word of God made flesh (See John 1:1, 14). He was present and active in creation. Perhaps if we could have been present on the sixth day of creation we might have heard the Lord Himself say, “Behold the man!” For Adam was the crown of God’s creation, made in His own image, fashioned by His own hand and brought to life with His own breath. The Lord gave him authority over all the earth. But Adam rebelled and sinned, exchanging his king’s crown for a curse of thorns and death.
 
Now John invites us to behold this new Adam, this man named Jesus. Take a closer look. He wears the crown meant for the first Adam, albeit made from the twisted thorns from sin’s curse. He wears the purple robes of royalty meant to clothe God’s naked image bearers, yet humanity has hung them on His beaten back in unholy mockery. His face and body bear the wounds of the hands that took the forbidden fruit. His blood is shed, His body pierced, He dies the death meant for sinful man, so that we might receive eternal life through faith in Him.
 
“Idou ho anthrōpos! Ecce homo! Behold the man!”
 
“Look upon the One whom you have pierced!” (Zech. 12:10, John 19:37).
 
PRAYER: Dear Father, we have looked upon the one whom we have pierced. We are undone. Yet we are set free and forgiven. What wonder! What love and mercy! We have beheld the man, the Son of God, Jesus. We have believed. We are Yours! We will follow Him wherever He leads. In His name, we pray and live, amen.

‘Jesus answered, “My Kingdom is not an earthly kingdom. If it were, my followers would fight to keep me from being handed over to the Jewish leaders. But my Kingdom is not of this world.”’ (John 18:36 NLT).

From: May 30, 2019

THE KING WHOSE KINGDOM IS NOT OF THIS WORLD

When Pilate asked Jesus whether he was the king of the Jews, Jesus answered that his kingdom is not of this world. Jesus did not deny being a King. He used the word “my” three times saying, “My Kingdom and my followers.” So, Jesus is a king. But he did make it clear that his Kingdom and followers were no threat to Rome, nor any other earthly kingdom. If his was a earthly kingdom, his followers would have fought to defend their king. But Jesus wouldn’t allow it. He even rebuked Peter for drawing his sword to cut off the ear of one of those who came to arrest Jesus.
 
Jesus came to establish an eternal kingdom, a heavenly kingdom. Yet, though his kingdom is not “of” this world, that does not mean his kingdom is not “in” it. For didn’t Jesus teach his disciples to pray, “Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven”?
 
Where in the world is Christ’s kingdom? Wherever Christ is recognized as king. Have you made Christ your King? Then His Kingdom is “in” your house.
 
Christ’s Kingdom does not exist according to worldly principles, nor is it defended by worldly methods. So when worldly kingdoms rise and fall, Christ’s Kingdom and followers are unaffected. For theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven.
 
PRAYER: Dear Father, we renew our allegiance to King Jesus today. He declare Him King over every arena of our lives. We pray as Jesus taught us. Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. In Jesus’ name, amen.

‘Jesus answered, “You could have no power at all against Me unless it had been given you from above.”‘ (John 19:11 NKJV).

From: May 30, 2017

The Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, warned Jesus that he had the power to crucify or release him. But Jesus replied that the only reason he could have any authority against Him was because it had been given him “from above.” In other words, God the Father had authorized the crucifixion of His Son.
 
Jesus gave His life willingly, no one took His life from Him. As Jesus said, “I lay down my life that I may take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again. This charge I have received from my Father” (John 10:17-18).
 
As believers, we are under Christ’s authority. We have received His charge. We can walk in confidence that no worldly power can touch us without His knowledge and permission.

“But David went up the ascent of the Mount of Olives, weeping as he went” (2 Samuel 15:30 ESV)

From: May 30, 2016

When David was betrayed, he fled from Jerusalem going East towards the Mount of Olives. As he climbed the Mount he wept and prayed that God would have mercy on him. God heard David’s prayer and restored him to the throne. Centuries later, Jesus, Son of David, left Jerusalem to pray on that same Mount. Weeping he prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Matt. 26:39). God prevented David’s betrayer from succeeding, but Jesus’ betrayer found him there on the Mount of Olives and turned him over to the authorities to be crucified. God showed David mercy, but poured out the judgment that belonged to us all upon His Son, Jesus. Jesus took the wages of our sin, so that God could show not only David, but all of us His mercy.

“So David went up by the Ascent of the Mount of Olives, and wept as he went up” (1 Samuel 15:30 NKJV)

From: May 30, 2015

When David was betrayed, he fled from Jerusalem going East towards the Mount of Olives. As he climbed the Mount he wept and prayed that God would have mercy on him. God heard David’s prayer and restored him to the throne. Centuries later, Jesus, Son of David, left Jerusalem to pray on that same Mount. Weeping he prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Matt. 26:39). God prevented David’s betrayer from succeeding, but Jesus’ betrayer found him there on the Mount of Olives and turned him over to the authorities to be crucified. God showed David mercy, but poured out the judgment that belonged to us all upon His Son, Jesus. Jesus took the wages of our sin, so that God could show not only David, but all of us His mercy.

“David walked up the road to the Mount of Olives, weeping as he went” (2 Samuel 15:30 NLT)

From: May 30, 2014

When David was betrayed, he fled from Jerusalem going East towards the Mount of Olives. As he climbed the Mount he wept and prayed that God would have mercy on him. God heard David’s prayer and restored him to the throne. Centuries later, Jesus, Son of David, left Jerusalem to pray on that same Mount. Weeping he prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Matt. 26:39). God prevented David’s betrayer from succeeding, but Jesus’ betrayer found him there on the Mount of Olives and turned him over to the authorities to be crucified. God showed David mercy, but poured out the judgment that belonged to us all upon His Son, Jesus. Jesus took the wages of our sin, so that God could show not only David, but all of us His mercy.

“Actually, I was born and came into the world to testify to the truth. All who love the truth recognize that what I say is true” (John 18:37)

From: May 30, 2012

How Jesus answered Pilate’s questioning. Pilate’s response: “What is truth?” We live in a relativistic age that questions the idea of absolute truth too. But those who “love truth” will see the truth revealed in Jesus.

“David continued up the Mount of Olives, weeping as he went” (2 Samuel 15:30)

From: May 30, 2011

Fleeing from Absalom, David wept on the Mount. Jesus, Son of David, wept here too, crying out, “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem!” He also prayed here in the Garden the night of His betrayal. Do you have a “Mount of Olives” in which to pray?