May 30

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‘Jesus answered, “My Kingdom is not an earthly kingdom. If it were, my followers would fight to keep me from being handed over to the Jewish leaders. But my Kingdom is not of this world.”’ (John 18:36 NLT).

From: May 30, 2019

THE KING WHOSE KINGDOM IS NOT OF THIS WORLD

When Pilate asked Jesus whether he was the king of the Jews, Jesus answered that his kingdom is not of this world. Jesus did not deny being a King. He used the word “my” three times saying, “My Kingdom and my followers.” So, Jesus is a king. But he did make it clear that his Kingdom and followers were no threat to Rome, nor any other earthly kingdom. If his was a earthly kingdom, his followers would have fought to defend their king. But Jesus wouldn’t allow it. He even rebuked Peter for drawing his sword to cut off the ear of one of those who came to arrest Jesus.
 
Jesus came to establish an eternal kingdom, a heavenly kingdom. Yet, though his kingdom is not “of” this world, that does not mean his kingdom is not “in” it. For didn’t Jesus teach his disciples to pray, “Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven”?
 
Where in the world is Christ’s kingdom? Wherever Christ is recognized as king. Have you made Christ your King? Then His Kingdom is “in” your house.
 
Christ’s Kingdom does not exist according to worldly principles, nor is it defended by worldly methods. So when worldly kingdoms rise and fall, Christ’s Kingdom and followers are unaffected. For theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven.
 
PRAYER: Dear Father, we renew our allegiance to King Jesus today. He declare Him King over every arena of our lives. We pray as Jesus taught us. Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. In Jesus’ name, amen.

‘Jesus answered, “You could have no power at all against Me unless it had been given you from above.”‘ (John 19:11 NKJV).

From: May 30, 2017

The Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, warned Jesus that he had the power to crucify or release him. But Jesus replied that the only reason he could have any authority against Him was because it had been given him “from above.” In other words, God the Father had authorized the crucifixion of His Son.
 
Jesus gave His life willingly, no one took His life from Him. As Jesus said, “I lay down my life that I may take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again. This charge I have received from my Father” (John 10:17-18).
 
As believers, we are under Christ’s authority. We have received His charge. We can walk in confidence that no worldly power can touch us without His knowledge and permission.

“But David went up the ascent of the Mount of Olives, weeping as he went” (2 Samuel 15:30 ESV)

From: May 30, 2016

When David was betrayed, he fled from Jerusalem going East towards the Mount of Olives. As he climbed the Mount he wept and prayed that God would have mercy on him. God heard David’s prayer and restored him to the throne. Centuries later, Jesus, Son of David, left Jerusalem to pray on that same Mount. Weeping he prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Matt. 26:39). God prevented David’s betrayer from succeeding, but Jesus’ betrayer found him there on the Mount of Olives and turned him over to the authorities to be crucified. God showed David mercy, but poured out the judgment that belonged to us all upon His Son, Jesus. Jesus took the wages of our sin, so that God could show not only David, but all of us His mercy.

“So David went up by the Ascent of the Mount of Olives, and wept as he went up” (1 Samuel 15:30 NKJV)

From: May 30, 2015

When David was betrayed, he fled from Jerusalem going East towards the Mount of Olives. As he climbed the Mount he wept and prayed that God would have mercy on him. God heard David’s prayer and restored him to the throne. Centuries later, Jesus, Son of David, left Jerusalem to pray on that same Mount. Weeping he prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Matt. 26:39). God prevented David’s betrayer from succeeding, but Jesus’ betrayer found him there on the Mount of Olives and turned him over to the authorities to be crucified. God showed David mercy, but poured out the judgment that belonged to us all upon His Son, Jesus. Jesus took the wages of our sin, so that God could show not only David, but all of us His mercy.

“David walked up the road to the Mount of Olives, weeping as he went” (2 Samuel 15:30 NLT)

From: May 30, 2014

When David was betrayed, he fled from Jerusalem going East towards the Mount of Olives. As he climbed the Mount he wept and prayed that God would have mercy on him. God heard David’s prayer and restored him to the throne. Centuries later, Jesus, Son of David, left Jerusalem to pray on that same Mount. Weeping he prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Matt. 26:39). God prevented David’s betrayer from succeeding, but Jesus’ betrayer found him there on the Mount of Olives and turned him over to the authorities to be crucified. God showed David mercy, but poured out the judgment that belonged to us all upon His Son, Jesus. Jesus took the wages of our sin, so that God could show not only David, but all of us His mercy.