May 2

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‘Jesus replied. “My time has not yet come.”’ (John 2:4 NLT).

From: May 2, 2018

CHRIST’S ATTENTION TO TIMING
When Jesus’ mother brought it to His attention that there was no more wine at the wedding, He replied that it was not yet His time. She may have been His mother, but she was not aware of the details of His mission. It was not yet time to begin His public ministry. He therefore miraculously solved the wine shortage in a private manner, so that only His mother, disciples and the servants knew about it. Even the emcee didn’t know the source and gave credit to the bridegroom (v.9).
 
This wasn’t the only time Jesus had to correct a family member for suggesting He act before His time. It was His brothers who urged Him to go to Jerusalem and “show himself to the world” (John 7:4). But He responded, “Now is not the right time for me to go, but you can go anytime” (John 7:6).
 
When the time did come for Jesus to go to Jerusalem and to the cross, He did not hesitate. Jesus said, “Now the time has come for the Son of Man to enter into his glory” (John 12:23). Jesus fulfilled His mission in the “fulness of time.” As the apostle Paul wrote, “But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons” (Gal. 4:4-5).
 
Christ’s timing was perfect.

“A quick-tempered man acts foolishly” (Proverbs 14:17 NKJV).

From: May 2, 2017

The man who is easily offended and quick to lose his temper will continually do and say things that make him look foolish. Afterwards, he is often sorry and ashamed, so he repents of his behavior. Yet, his short fuse remains, so that he returns to his folly again and again. The foolish behavior will not stop until his angry temperament is properly dealt with.
 
Anger itself isn’t sin, but uncontrolled anger can lead to sin. So, we must ask the Holy Spirit to give us a long-fuse and self-control, so that Christ rules us, rather than our anger. As the apostle Paul wrote, “Be angry and do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger, and give no opportunity to the devil” (Eph. 4:26-27).

“Let all that I am praise the Lord; with my whole heart, I will praise his holy name” (Psalm 103:1 ESV)

From: May 2, 2016

This psalm of David begins with an introspective imperative that every detail of his life, both within and without, would live in a continuous state of worshiping God. Was there an area where David worshiped his own will or had found his desire focused on another? If so, he commanded himself to “let all that I am,” every part of my “heart,” be focused on praising the Lord.
Is there an area in your life today that isn’t in alignment with God’s will for you? If there is, then how can you truly worship the Lord? How can you bring only part of your heart, part of your life to Him in praise? This is half-worship, and God will not accept it. Stop being half-hearted in following Jesus. Confess your sins and “let all” that you are praise the Lord. Praise Him with your “whole heart.”

“This beginning of signs Jesus did in Cana of Galilee, and manifested His glory; and His disciples believed in Him” (John 2:11 NKJV)

From: May 2, 2015

This is the first of seven “signs” that the apostle John recorded in his gospel. John calls them signs and not miracles because signs point to something other than themselves. On a recent trip to see the Grand Canyon I noticed “Grand Canyon” road signs all along the way as we drove up from Phoenix. Yet, we didn’t fly from NC to AZ to see these signs. We didn’t stop driving until we stood before the Canyon itself! Many during Jesus’ day were attracted to his miracles, but his true disciples saw them as signs that pointed to Him. Jesus turned the water into wine at a wedding in Cana. The master of the feast and the wedding guests were enthralled with the taste of the new wine that Jesus had made, but the disciples were focused on the wine’s Maker. The whole creation is a miraculous sign pointing to the Creator, yet many worship the former without recognizing the latter (Rom. 1:19-25).

“This miraculous sign at Cana in Galilee was the first time Jesus revealed his glory. And his disciples believed in him” (John 2:11 NLT)

From: May 2, 2014

This is the first of seven “signs” that the apostle John recorded in his gospel. John calls them signs and not miracles because signs point to something other than themselves. On a recent trip to see the Grand Canyon I noticed “Grand Canyon” road signs all along the way as we drove up from Phoenix. Yet, we didn’t fly from NC to AZ to see these signs. We didn’t stop driving until we stood before the Canyon itself! Many during Jesus’ day were attracted to his miracles, but his true disciples saw them as signs that pointed to Him. Jesus turned the water into wine at a wedding in Cana. The master of the feast and the wedding guests were enthralled with the taste of the new wine that Jesus had made, but the disciples were focused on the wine’s Maker. The whole creation is a miraculous sign pointing to the Creator, yet many worship the former without recognizing the latter (Rom. 1:19-25).

“But he did not know that the LORD had left him” (Judges 16:20 ESV)

From: May 2, 2013

Samson took God’s presence and power for granted, but when Delilah shaved off his seven locks, the Lord left him. Samson didn’t even notice… until it was too late. We shouldn’t wonder at Samson’s shortcomings. We can be just like him. When we step on the slippery slope of sin, we slowly slide away from God so gradually that we barely notice. Then one day, we awake and find ourselves in trouble, asking God where He’s gone! If God’s presence moved, would you notice?

“But he did not know that the LORD had left him” (Judges 16:20)

From: May 2, 2011

Samson didn’t even notice when the Lord’s anointing left him. We can make this mistake when we make our worship and ministry too man-centered. Don’t presume the Lord’s presence in your work. Instead, join Him in His. Would you notice if He wasn’t present in your life or church?