February 17

8 results found

“Your unfailing love, O Lord, is as vast as the heavens; your faithfulness reaches beyond the clouds” (Psalm 36:5 NLT).

From: February 17, 2018

The quality of the love of God is unfailing and its quantity is as vast as the heavens. David knew and wrote of the love of God. Yet, its highest expression is found in Christ. For He is the apex of God’s love expressed. He is the demonstration of God’s love for all to see. As the apostle Paul wrote, “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Rom. 5:8).

“If a person sins, and commits any of these things which are forbidden to be done by the commandments of the Lord, though he does not know it, yet he is guilty and shall bear his iniquity” (Leviticus 5:17 NKJV).

From: February 17, 2017

Centuries before Roman law declared, “Ignorantia juris non excusat” (Ignorance of the law excuses not), God gave the same to Moses. The number and detail of Levitical law is overwhelming to read and no doubt, even more overwhelming to keep. A careful numbering of Levitical law brings the total to 613 commandments (248 positive “i.e. “Remember the Sabbath” + 365 negative “i.e. Thou shalt not kill”). The majority of the commands (603) were given to further describe the keeping of the Decalogue (Literally, “Ten Words” or Ten Commandments). Yet, Jesus was able to summarize the whole into one word, namely, love: “Love God and love others as yourself” (Matt. 22:36-40).
 
Whether it’s one, ten or 613, the Bible says that none of us can keep the law without sin (Rom. 3:23). Claiming ignorance of God’s law does not excuse us. Only an appropriate sacrifice will satisfy. Thankfully, the complex law and sacrificial system were satisfied in one person, Jesus Christ. He has kept the law and offered Himself as the unblemished sacrifice for our sin, those we committed knowingly and unknowingly. He bore our sin and guilt that we might receive His righteousness!

“And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart…” (Mark 3:5 ESV)

From: February 17, 2016

The Pharisees brought out the full range of emotion from our Lord Jesus. When He tried to show them the spirit of the Sabbath, they clung to the letter of the law, even that which they themselves had added to it. He asked them a simple question, one that begged a correct response. He asked whether the law permitted good on the Sabbath or evil? They wouldn’t reply. So, he put the man with the withered hand before the whole assembly in the synagogue and healed him. The man and his family rejoiced, but the Pharisees left angry, plotting with the Herodians, whom they normally hated, to plan the killing of Jesus. This scene caused conflicting emotions in Jesus. He was both angry and sad. Angry at the sinful pride that wouldn’t answer His question. And sad at the hard hearts that wouldn’t listen.

“And it shall be, when he is guilty in any of these matters, that he shall confess that he has sinned in that thing; and he shall bring his trespass offering to the Lord for his sin which he has committed” (Leviticus 5:5-6 NKJV)

From: February 17, 2015

The Mosaic sacrificial system was very specific and demanding, yet it revealed our desperate need for a Savior that could set us free not only from sin’s penalty, but from sin’s power over us. Yet, the principles revealed in the old system for receiving forgiveness are still true. We still must admit our sin, confessing it specifically to God. Then, we must trust in Christ as our ultimate, once-for-all, sufficient “trespass offering” to God for the forgiveness of our sins. Under the Old Testament sacrificial system, our sin offerings would never be enough. The work of sacrifice would never finish. But Christ finished it. The New Testament is the fulfillment of the Old. Have you confessed your sin and placed your trust in the sacrifice of Christ as payment?

“He looked around at them angrily and was deeply saddened by their hard hearts” (Mark 3:5 NLT)

From: February 17, 2014

The Pharisees brought out the full range of emotion from our Lord Jesus. When He tried to show them the spirit of the Sabbath, they clung to the letter of the law, even that which they themselves had added to it. He asked them a simple question, one that begged a correct response. He asked whether the law permitted good on the Sabbath or evil? They wouldn’t reply. So, he put the man with the withered hand before the whole assembly in the synagogue and healed him. The man and his family rejoiced, but the Pharisees left angry, plotting with the Herodians, whom they normally hated, to plot the killing of Jesus. This scene caused conflicting emotions in Jesus. He was both angry and sad. Angry at the sinful pride that wouldn’t answer His question. And sad at the hard hearts that wouldn’t listen.

“Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners” (Mark 2:17 ESV)

From: February 17, 2013

This was Jesus’ reply when challenged by the Pharisees about eating at the tax collector Levi’s (Matthew’s) house. The Pharisees were separatists. They would not associate with sinners. But Jesus came to save sinners. How should today’s church be affected by this? How do we resolve the tension between being holy and being evangelists? Simple. Follow Jesus.