April 11

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‘”When you put on a luncheon or a banquet,” he said, “don’t invite your friends, brothers, relatives, and rich neighbors. For they will invite you back, and that will be your only reward. Instead, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, and the blind. Then at the resurrection of the righteous, God will reward you for inviting those who could not repay you.”’ (Luke 14:12-14 NLT).

From: April 11, 2018

WHO ARE YOU INVITING TO THE PARTY?
While seated at a dinner, Jesus took note of the people the host had invited. He observed that he had invited his own circle of family and friends. The host must have been surprised to hear the advice that Jesus gave. Invite people that are different than you. Invite those who can’t invite you back. And the Lord will reward you.
 
The implications of Christ’s word to the host of the dinner are very troubling to us, aren’t they? Invite people to the table that are different than you. People that can’t pay you back. People that will not advance your social standing. In fact, invite people that will probably cause those of your own family and social class to shun you for even hanging out with these “other” people.
 
Why did Jesus teach this? Because that’s what the Father has done for us. He is the Host of Heaven and He has invited us–– “the poor, the crippled, the lame, and the blind” of this world to His banquet table.

“For whoever exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted” (Luke 14:11 NKJV).

From: April 11, 2017

Jesus taught this timeless spiritual principle promoting humility over self-promotion. He illustrated the principle with a parable concerning seat selection at a wedding banquet. He observed that it would be better to take a “lowly” seat at the table and have the master elevate you to a better one, than vice versa. A corollary to this principle is “Let another man praise you, and not your own mouth” (Prov. 27:2).

“Restore us, O God; Cause Your face to shine, And we shall be saved!” (Psalm 80:3 NKJV)

From: April 11, 2015

This is the repetitive chorus of Psalm 80, perhaps written after the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon (“broken down hedges” – v.12). The psalm is a prayer to God, begging Him to “restore us” to Him. They recognized their inability to restore themselves. They needed God to restore them, to bring them out of captivity and return them to Himself. This is a powerful prayer: God restore us. God show mercy on us. God save us. And He did answer their prayer, especially the part found in verse 17 about the “son of Man.” This points to the Messiah, Jesus the Christ, who is the fulfillment of their prayer for restoration and salvation.

“Turn us again to yourself, O God. Make your face shine down upon us. Only then will we be saved” (Psalm 80:3 NLT)

From: April 11, 2014

This is the repetitive chorus of Psalm 80, perhaps written after the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon (“broken down walls” – v.12). The psalm is a prayer to God, begging Him to “turn us again” to Him. They recognized their inability to turn themselves. They needed God to restore them, to bring them out of captivity and return them to Himself. This is a powerful prayer: God restore us. God show mercy on us. God save us. And He did answer their prayer, especially the part found in verse 17 about the “son of your choice” (“Son of Man”). This points to the Messiah, who is Jesus the Christ, who is the fulfillment of their prayer for salvation.

“And when the soles of the feet of the priests bearing the ark of the LORD shall rest in the waters of the Jordan, the waters of the Jordan shall be cut off from flowing” (Joshua 3:13 ESV)

From: April 11, 2013

Joshua had replaced Moses as leader. God wanted to “exalt” Joshua so that the Israelites would respect his leadership, so He called him to part the Jordan much as Moses had been called to part the Red Sea. God instructed him to have the priests carry the Ark into the Jordan and as their soles touched the river, the waters would stop, so that the people could cross on dry land. I wonder if this is where the saying “Sometimes you just have to get your feet wet” came?