Colossians

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Be Thankful

November 29, 2015 | Colossians 3:15-17 | discipleship, thankfulness

This past week we celebrated a national holiday called “Thanksgiving.” It is intended for us to celebrate all that we’ve been given and be thankful for our families and for God’s provision. Yet, we often have a hard time with this mark of being Christian. We struggle with ingratitude. We complain. Instead of being thankful, we’re often filled with a heart of ingratitude.In the apostle Paul’s letter to the church in Colossae, he told them that the result of having Jesus as their Lord and Savior was a heart of  thanksgiving.

“And let the peace of God rule in your hearts…l” (Colossians 3:15 NKJV)

October 7, 2015

Paul said that we are to let the peace of God “rule.” The Greek word for rule is βραβευέτω, brabeuetō. It literally means to “umpire, arbitrate, to let make the call.” When our circumstances appear to overwhelm us, we are to let the peace, the shalom, of Christ act as our umpire, determining what’s in or out of bounds. Letting the peace of Christ umpire our hearts, we don’t let circumstances, nor fleshly emotion rule, we let Christ rule.

“He has delivered us from the power of darkness and conveyed us into the kingdom of the Son of His love” (Colossians 1:13 NKJV)

October 4, 2015

Paul wrote to the church at Colossae describing their change of spiritual citizenship. Because they had confessed their faith in Christ, the Father transferred them from the dominion of darkness into the kingdom of His beloved Son. God is still accepting new kingdom citizens today. His Son has already paid the price for our redemption. Yet, just as a new American citizen must take an oath of allegiance to the US constitution, so the one desiring kingdom citizenship must confess faith in Christ.

The Mark of Peace

May 31, 2015 | Colossians 3:12-15 | character, discipleship, fruit of the spirit

Pastor Gary Combs continued our sermon series on the fruit of the Spirit as found in Galatians 5:22-23 by helping us understand how to let the peace of Christ rule our lives. This peace comes when we submit to God’s will and allow him to determine our identity, thoughts, will, and relationships with others.

Foundations

December 28, 2014 | Colossians 2:6-15 | discipleship

Has anyone ever made you feel intellectually inferior for being a Christian? In this sermon, Justin Norden helps us understand how to build our life’s foundation on Christ alone, and how that allows us to be intellectually stimulated and have a consistent world-view.

“And let the peace that comes from Christ rule in your hearts” (Colossians 3:15 NLT)

October 7, 2014

Paul said that we are to let the peace of Christ “rule.” The Greek word for rule is βραβευέτω, brabeuetō. It literally means to “umpire, arbitrate, to let make the call.” When our circumstances appear to overwhelm us, we are to let the peace, the shalom, of Christ act as our umpire, determining what’s in or out of bounds.

“Don’t let anyone capture you with empty philosophies and high-sounding nonsense that come from human thinking and from the spiritual powers of this world, rather than from Christ” (Colossians 2:8 NLT)

October 6, 2014

Human thinking is marred by sin’s mind-twisting effect. And it is further limited by its tiny perspective across time and space. Yet, this does not dissuade its foolish claims for superior wisdom. Paul calls man’s thinking “empty” and “high-sounding nonsense.” Instead, he calls us to place our trust in the revelation of God’s wisdom given in Christ. Christ is the Wisdom and the Power of God (1 Cor. 1:24). For those who would be lifted out of sin’s tangled-thinking and know the renewing of the mind, Christ is the answer.

“So we tell others about Christ, warning everyone and teaching everyone with all the wisdom God has given us. We want to present them to God, perfect in their relationship to Christ” (Colossians 1:28 NLT)

October 5, 2014

Paul’s goal for the Colossians and for everyone to whom he preached is here revealed: that he might present them to God as “perfect” (fully mature, finished, complete) in Christ. He did not wish to just introduce them to Christ or to tell them a little about the Savior. No, Paul used every faculty available to him, “warning and teaching” them to not only believe, but to follow Christ, becoming like Him in all things. This should still be the goal of those who would answer the call to pastor. It should also be the goal of every person who would call themselves “Christian.”

“Christ is the visible image of the invisible God” (Colossians 1:15a NLT)

October 4, 2014

Creation itself is a general revelation of God to those who would acknowledge it. Yet, the ultimate revelation is Christ. No one has seen the invisible God, but Christ is His “visible image.” If you want to know what God is like, then gaze upon the face of Jesus. Read the gospels and see God’s nature revealed. Through Christ, God has created all, offers redemption and sustains all. Everything was made by Christ and for Christ. You were made for Him. So, turn your eyes upon Jesus. Look full in His wonderful face and the things of earth will grow strangely dim in the light of His glory and grace.

“A” is for Abilities

January 26, 2014 | Colossians 3:17-4:1 | discipleship

Pastor Gary Combs continues the “Shaped for Significance” series with this message from Colossians 3:17 through 4:1 about using our God-given abilities to bring glory to Him. This message both points to the purpose of our abilities as well as offering a theology of work. It also encourages the believer to see all that they do as sacred work.