Acts

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“Barnabas agreed and wanted to take along John Mark. But Paul disagreed strongly, since John Mark had deserted them in Pamphylia and had not continued with them in their work” (Acts 15:37-38 NLT).

June 24, 2018

THE DISAGREEMENT OVER JOHN MARK
Paul wanted to travel to check on the new believers that had come to faith on their first missionary journey. Barnabas agreed. However, they disagreed on taking John Mark with them again. Apparently, Paul considered the young man unreliable after he had “deserted them” and went home early on their last trip. But Barnabas, being the encourager that he was, wanted to give John Mark a second chance. Just as Barnabas had seen the potential in Paul, he saw it in John Mark. This led to a sharp disagreement, so they ended up splitting up the power team. Barnabas began to travel with John Mark. And Paul took on Silas as his new missionary companion.

Even committed believers can have disagreements. In this case, it led to two missionary teams going out. Over time, apparently the disagreement was forgiven and forgotten. For Paul wrote in at least two places concerning John Mark. In his letter to the church at Colossae, he wrote, “Aristarchus, who is in prison with me, sends you his greetings, and so does Mark, Barnabas’s cousin. As you were instructed before, make Mark welcome if he comes your way” (Col. 4:10). When others had deserted Paul while he was in prison, John Mark had remained faithful to him.

And in Paul’s second letter to Timothy, he wrote, “Bring Mark with you when you come, for he will be helpful to me in my ministry” (2 Tim. 4:11). Paul’s impression of John Mark had certainly changed.

Traditionally, John Mark or simply “Mark,” is considered the author of the gospel according to Mark. I’m glad Barnabas kept on believing in John Mark, and Paul too, for that matter!

“We believe that we are all saved the same way, by the undeserved grace of the Lord Jesus.” (Acts 15:11 NLT).

June 23, 2018

ONLY ONE WAY OF SALVATION
After certain Judaizers came to Antioch, teaching that circumcision was required for salvation, Paul and Barnabas were sent to bring the question to the apostles at Jerusalem. After much deliberation, Peter stood and reminded everyone that he had been the first one chosen to carry the gospel to the Gentiles. He reminded them how the Spirit had been given to them when they heard the gospel and believed in Jesus. He questioned why the yoke of the law should be added to salvation when even the Jews couldn’t keep it and in fact, weren’t saved by the law, but by the “undeserved grace of the Lord Jesus.”

The means of salvation is grace, which is God’s unmerited favor revealed to us in Christ Jesus. As the apostle Paul wrote, “For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast” (Eph. 2:8-9).

There is not a Jewish “way” or a Gentile “way” of salvation. We are all saved by the “same way,” which is by the grace of Jesus!

“Upon arriving in Antioch, they called the church together and reported everything God had done through them and how he had opened the door of faith to the Gentiles, too.” (Acts 14:27 NLT).

June 22, 2018

FIRST CHURCH MISSIONS REPORT
Although the 72 disciples that Jesus sent out two-by-two were perhaps the first to offer a missions report, this report by Paul and Barnabas to the church at Antioch may have been the first to a church. While there was no mention of souvenirs brought back, nor a slide show to illustrate the trip, they reported “everything God had done” and how God had “opened the door of faith” for the Gentiles too. This mission trip, from its Spirit-led commissioning service to its comprehensive mission report, is a paradigm for modern missions. They reported back to the local church that had sent them. Yet, in reality, they were reporting back to Jesus, who is the Head of the Church, His body.

You don’t have to leave town to be on mission. Everyone who follows Jesus is sent–– sent to your family, your neighbors, your classmates, coworkers, and city. What will you report to Jesus?

“The following week almost the entire city turned out to hear them preach the word of the Lord. But when some of the Jews saw the crowds, they were jealous; so they slandered Paul and argued against whatever he said.” (Acts 13:44-45 NLT).

June 21, 2018

GREAT RESULTS OFTEN MARKED BY GREAT RESISTANCE
The ministry of Paul and Barnabas was marked by great results and great resistance. It was in Antioch Pisidia that Luke first began to refer to “Saul” as “Paul.” It it was also at that time that Luke began to refer to this great missionary team in reverse order, instead of “Barnabas and Saul,” he called them “Paul and Barnabas.” Paul really came into his own at Antioch Pisidia, boldly declaring the gospel and standing firm against those who opposed it. Barnabas must have been pleased to see how the trust he had put into Paul was now being proved right.

Yet, even though “almost the entire city turned out” to hear Paul and Barnabas preach the gospel, the evil one was actively present to slander and resist. Great results are often marked by great resistance. Therefore, stand firm and keep on preaching! The Lord will prevail.

“And now we are here to bring you this Good News…” (Acts 13:32 NLT).

June 20, 2018

WHY ARE YOU HERE?
Paul and Barnabas traveled from Syrian Antioch to Antioch Pisidia (See Acts 13:14, in modern day Turkey), commissioned by the church to carry the gospel to the Gentiles. They were not tourists. They were not just passing through. They were “here” with a purpose. What purpose? To bring the Good News to the people in Antioch Pisidia.

Why are you “here?”

‘One day as these men were worshiping the Lord and fasting, the Holy Spirit said, “Appoint Barnabas and Saul for the special work to which I have called them.”’ (Acts 13:2 NLT).

June 19, 2018

THE WORSHIP SERVICE THAT TURNED INTO A COMMISSIONING SERVICE
Five key leaders in the Antioch church were fasting and praying one day when the Spirit spoke to them. The Scripture does not say how the Spirit communicated. Did all of the men or only one hear the instruction? Was it an audible voice or an internal awareness? The Scripture doesn’t report whether the men were asking for direction. In fact, it appears they were simply having a time of worship together, as church leaders should always do. Regardless, the men heard the Spirit and obeyed.

The Spirit chose Barnabas and Saul. The order in which the five Antioch church leaders was listed placed Barnabas first and Saul last. Apparently, Barnabas was the senior pastor and Saul was the new guy. Yet, the Spirit put them together to build one of the greatest missionary teams in Christian history. The Spirit chose them for “special work.” What was this special work? It was to take the gospel to the Gentiles.

So, the leaders of the Antioch church immediately laid hands on Barnabas and Saul, commissioning them for special service, and sent them out.

“About that time King Herod Agrippa began to persecute some believers in the church. He had the apostle James (John’s brother) killed with a sword” (Acts 12:1-2 NLT).

June 18, 2018

A FALSE KING PERSECUTES THE TRUE KING
Herod Agrippa was the grandson of Herod the Great, who tried to kill the infant Jesus by murdering all of the baby boys age two and under in Bethlehem. His uncle, Herod Antipas, beheaded John the Baptist and ridiculed Jesus, sending Him back to Pilate for judgment. Herod Agrippa, who was more Roman than Jewish, took up the family habit of persecuting Christians. He had James the elder killed with the sword, which indicated execution by beheading.

The mother of James and his brother, John, had asked that her sons be seated on either side of Jesus when He came into His kingdom. Jesus replied that they didn’t know what they were asking. He asked, “Are you able to drink from the bitter cup of suffering I am about to drink?” (Matt.20:22). They replied that that were able. To which Jesus responded that they would indeed drink from the bitter cup of suffering. James, son of Zebedee, and brother of John, was the first apostle martyred.

And what of the false king, Herod Agrippa? His reign was short lived. He died of worms after accepting the glory that belonged to God.

“Then Barnabas went on to Tarsus to look for Saul” (Acts 11:25 NLT).

June 17, 2018

WOULD SAUL HAVE BECOME PAUL WITHOUT BARNABAS?
When the apostles in Jerusalem heard about the great number of Gentiles coming to the Lord at Antioch, they sent their trusted representative, Barnabas, to the city. His real name was Joseph, but he had been nicknamed “Barnabas” by the apostles, which according to Acts 4:36 meant “Son of Encouragement.” He was from the tribe of Levi and grew up on the Island of Cyprus. He once sold a field and gave all the money to the apostles (Acts 4:37).

When Barnabas went to Antioch and saw how the Lord was moving there, he was overjoyed. He immediately decided to take the 4-day journey to Tarsus to look for Saul.

Why? The Bible doesn’t answer this question. But perhaps it was because he had heard Saul (whose name was changed to “Paul”) describe the word that Ananias had first spoken over him. For the Lord had told Ananias, “Saul is my chosen instrument to take my message to the Gentiles and to kings, as well as to the people of Israel” (Acts 9:15). Certainly, the first great gospel movement among the Gentiles was at Antioch.

Regardless, Barnabas went to get Saul when he saw the great need for disciple-makers in Antioch. The two of them worked together there for a full year.

It was Barnabas who introduced Saul to the apostles when they had at first refused to see him. And it was Barnabas that went to find him when his help was needed at Antioch. Would “Saul” have ever become “Paul” without Barnabas?

Do you have a “Barnabas” in your life, who encourages you to get out of your comfort zone and pursue God’s calling?

“The Jewish believers who came with Peter were amazed that the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on the Gentiles, too” (Acts 10:45 NLT).

June 16, 2018

ONE FLOCK WITH ONE SHEPHERD
When Peter preached to Cornelius, he and his whole Gentile household believed and were filled with the Holy Spirit. This amazed the Jewish believers because they had thought the Messiah to be exclusive to their people. Yet, if they had understood the preaching of Jesus, they would have known otherwise. For out of the Gentiles, Jesus would call sheep that belonged to Him too. As Jesus said, “I have other sheep, too, that are not in this sheepfold. I must bring them also. They will listen to my voice, and there will be one flock with one shepherd” (John 10:16).

“Do not call something unclean if God has made it clean.” (Acts 10:15 NLT).

June 15, 2018

DISTINCTION BETWEEN MEN AND MEATS REMOVED
While praying on the rooftop of Simon the Tanner, Peter saw a vision of ceremonially “unclean” foods lowered down from heaven on a sheet. The Lord told him to “kill and eat.” Peter refused, saying it was against Jewish law. But the Lord told Peter not to call it unclean now that God had called it clean. This vision was to prepare Peter to carry the gospel to the Gentiles, for the Roman captain, Cornelius, had already sent men to bring him.

The distinction between Jew and Gentile, along with the ceremonial laws that separated the Jews from other peoples, was now removed. The gospel would remove the distinction, making all men and women equal before the cross of Christ. As the apostle Paul would write, “There is no longer Jew or Gentile, slave or free, male and female. For you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Gal.3:28).