September 10

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“Then, besides all this, I have the daily burden of my concern for all the churches” (2 Corinthians 11:28 NLT).

From: September 10, 2018

THE PASTOR’S BURDEN
After listing many of the trials and tribulations he had endured as a church planter, the apostle Paul named the one constant concern that weighed on him— his burden for the churches. Certainly, the Spirit of the Lord strengthened Paul to carry this burden, yet it was the Lord that gave it to him in the first place.
 
Just as Jesus had told Peter, “If you love me, feed my sheep.” So, Paul keenly felt this same calling.
 
It was the apostle Peter who wrote this instruction to pastors: “Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you” (1 Peter 5:2). Paul felt this pastor’s burden. And so does every pastor today that is called of God and seeks to please Him by caring for His sheep.

“And He said, “Go, and tell this people: ‘Keep on hearing, but do not understand; Keep on seeing, but do not perceive.’” (Isaiah 6:9 NKJV).

From: September 10, 2017

Isaiah was given a difficult preaching assignment. He was to preach knowing that the people of Israel would not “understand,” nor “perceive” his message. The Israelites had been given the greatest access to the Word and works of God of any people in history, yet they had not listened to His Word, nor remembered His works. Therefore, God’s judgment would be according to their sin. He would continue to declare His Word and perform His works before them, yet they would not hear, nor see. The fulfillment of this prophecy was during the time of Christ, who was the supreme revelation of God to His people, yet they did not receive Him. Jesus quoted this passage from Isaiah many times during His earthly ministry knowing that only a remnant would believe (Matt. 13:14-15, Mark 4:12, John 12:40).
 
I’m glad that we have a new preaching mission today, the same one given to the apostle Paul by Jesus “to open their eyes, and to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins, and inheritance among them which are sanctified by faith that is in Me” (Acts 26:18).

“O God, save me by your name” (Psalm 54:1 ESV)

From: September 10, 2016

“What’s in a name?” So asked Shakespeare’s Juliet of Romeo, the implication being that his family name didn’t matter to her. Yet, David appealed to God’s “name” as the means of his salvation. He recognized the power expressed in God’s name, as he wrote in another psalm, “The name of the LORD is a strong tower” (Psa. 18:10). For God’s name is the manifestation of His character, revealing His divine attributes. And what is the “saving” name of God by which we might call? As Peter preached to the Jerusalem council, that name is JESUS, “for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved” (Acts 4:12). The name “Jesus” or “Yeshua” means “God’s salvation.” God has given Him the name “above every name” (Phil.2:9). Jesus tells us to “ask anything in His name” (John 14:14). What’s in a name? In the name of Jesus, everything.

“If I must boast, I will boast in the things which concern my infirmity” (2 Corinthians 11:30 NKJV)

From: September 10, 2015

The Corinthians had fallen prey to false teachers who claimed greater authority than Paul. In response to this, Paul found himself in the awkward position of establishing his own credentials. Paul didn’t like to boast, unless it was to boast of Christ. So instead, he boasted of his “infirmity,” his weakness. He listed the number of times he had been beaten, stoned, shipwrecked, hungry, naked, and left for dead. Paul chose to see what others might call a record of disgrace as his resume of suffering for Christ. He was fulfilling the calling that Christ had given him on the road to Damascus, namely: “he is a chosen vessel of Mine to bear My name before Gentiles, kings, and the children of Israel. For I will show him how many things he must suffer for My name’s sake” (Acts 9:15-16). Most boast of their successes to elevate their position, but Paul boasted of his sufferings, that Christ might be the One elevated in status.

“All right then, the Lord himself will give you the sign. Look! The virgin will conceive a child! She will give birth to a son and will call him Immanuel (which means ‘God is with us’)

From: September 10, 2014

(Isaiah 7:14 NLT).
Isaiah gave King Ahaz of Judah this sign from God to show that within only a few years, the kingdoms of Israel and Syria would be gone. Yet, this prophetic sign had a double fulfillment. It’s present-day fulfillment was for Ahaz, but it’s future fulfillment was for the entire human race. For 700 years later the virgin did indeed give birth to Jesus, the Son of God. Matthew quotes this verse to show its fulfillment in Christ (Matt. 1:23). Christ is the “holy seed” from “Israel’s stump” (Isa. 6:13). The Old Testament contains over 300 Messianic prophecies that are all fulfilled in Christ.