October 29

8 results found

“I will refuse to look at anything vile and vulgar” (Psalm 101:3 NLT).

From: October 29, 2018

THE DISCIPLINE OF THE EYES
David wrote this psalm, beginning nearly every verse with the personal pronoun, “I.” The psalm shows his desire to have a predetermined and settled code of conduct in facing certain situations that might tempt him to sin. In verse 3, he declared a determination to practice a discipline of the eyes. When anything vile and vulgar crossed his path, he would refuse to look at it. The Hebrew word here translated “vile and vulgar” is “belial,” which can also be rendered “wicked, ungodly, evil, or worthless.” David couldn’t help it if something “belial” appeared before him, but he could refuse to set his eyes upon it for any length of time.
 
The temptation to look too long has plagued us from the beginning. Didn’t Eve gaze at the forbidden fruit too long, seeing that it was “pleasant to the eyes” (Gen. 3:6)? And so, she and Adam seeing it, decided to eat it, plunging all of humanity into darkness.
 
Holy Spirit help us to be determined as David was to discipline our eyes. We can’t help what the world and its media parades before us, but depending on Your divine power, we can decide in advance to avoid looking too long. We can refuse to set our eyes on belial.

“I appeal to you for my son Onesimus, whom I have begotten while in my chains, who once was unprofitable to you, but now is profitable to you and to me” (Philemon 10-11 NKJV).

From: October 29, 2017

Paul wrote a personal letter to Philemon on behalf of his runaway slave, Onesimus, who may have also stolen from his master (v.18). Under Roman law, a slave was property and could be executed for such. Yet, Paul, who wrote from a Roman prison, had led Onesimus to faith in Christ and now called him a “son.” He sent the letter to let Philemon know of this and also that he was sending Onesimus home to him. Paul pled with Philemon, who he had also led to faith (v.19), to accept Onesimus back, not as a slave, but as a “beloved brother” (v.16). This is the new way of Christ on exhibit, that master and slave would become as brothers. This is the grace of Christ that brings forgiveness and reconciliation to every relationship. Surely, Onesimus would have been fearful of returning to Philemon, but Paul knew it was the only way that he could be truly free.

“For lack of wood the fire goes out, and where there is no whisperer, quarreling ceases” (Proverbs 26:20 ESV)

From: October 29, 2016

The fiery strife of gossip and intrigue quickly goes out when the wicked “whisperer” is removed. Contentious talebearers must be treated as incendiaries. We must refuse to listen to their gossip, correcting them for such talk. And if they refuse to stop such inflammatory backbiting, we must break fellowship with them. Strife soon ceases and peace follows when those who fuel quarreling with their words are silent.

“Arise, cry out in the night, At the beginning of the watches; Pour out your heart like water before the face of the Lord. Lift your hands toward Him For the life of your young children,
Who faint from hunger at the head of every street.” (Lamentations 2:19 NKJV)

From: October 29, 2015

Lamentations was written to “lament” (to grieve and mourn) the destruction of Jerusalem by the prophet Jeremiah. It calls the remnant of Judah to “cry out” to the Lord in their distress. Like the book of Job, it puzzles over the results of evil and suffering in the world. But unlike Job, which dealt with apparently undeserved evil, Jeremiah lamented a suffering that was of the people’s own making. It is a difficult book to read. Yet, it reminds us of our need to genuinely repent of sin and the suffering that inevitably follows. It calls us to lament over sin’s consequence and to beg God’s forgiveness, mercy and restoration. Only those who have hit life’s bottom seem to understand this lament of Jeremiah. Only those who are ready to “cry out in the night” find that these words give expression to the state of their hearts.

“I will sing of your love and justice, Lord. I will praise you with songs” (Psalm 101:1 NLT)

From: October 29, 2014

David understood something about God’s “love and justice.” He had learned both the loving mercy and the holy righteousness of God. Some today would view God with an “either/or” perspective. They “either” focus too much on God’s love, making Him a saccharine sweet, permissive push-over grandparent with a white beard (like Santa). “Or” they see an angry judge who is to blame for every war, disease, terrorist attack and natural disaster that befalls us. However, the Lord’s character is not simply “either/or,” but “both/and.” He is “both” full of love “and” holiness. The two traits are fully and equally His. Certainly the greatest revelation of God’s love and justice is seen in the cross of Christ. It was God’s great love that sent His Son and God’s great holiness that was satisfied by Christ’s sacrifice. At the cross we see God’s love and justice intersect.

“I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective for the full knowledge of every good thing that is in us for the sake of Christ” (Philemon 1:6)

From: October 29, 2013

There is a connection between sharing our faith with others and our own spiritual understanding. Answering the questions of faith for a seeker or new believer reminds us of what we believe. Often they ask a question we can’t answer and so we search more diligently than we would even for ourselves in order to help them. Sharing your faith causes it to increase in you!