November 21

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“Son of man, describe to the people of Israel the Temple I have shown you, so they will be ashamed of all their sins” (Ezekiel 43:10 NLT).

From: November 21, 2018

EZEKIEL’S TEMPLE
God revealed His purpose for describing a future temple to Ezekiel (referred to here as “Son of man”). Ezekiel’s temple has never been built. Solomon built the first, which was destroyed by the Babylonians, as Ezekiel’s prophecy predicted. Zerubbabel built the second, which was super-sized by Herod the Great, but destroyed by the Romans in 70 AD. Ezekiel’s temple is sometimes called the “Third Temple,” or the “Millennial Temple.” Depending on one’s eschatology, some would see it as describing a spiritual temple fulfilled by the church. Others would see a literal fulfillment in the last days or during the Millennial kingdom. Regardless, Ezekiel was to describe it, so that the people of Israel would be “ashamed of all their sins.”
 
Shame is an appropriate response to sin. Yet, there is a hardening of the heart which reduces shame to a dull tickling and then a complete denial. Ezekiel was to describe God’s future temple and returning glory, so that their hearts would feel shame, turning to God in repentance for forgiveness and salvation.
 
Christ is God’s provision for our sin and shame. He came to take the sin and shame of those would believe in Him.

“Confess your trespasses to one another, and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The effective, fervent prayer of a righteous man avails much” (James 5:16 NKJV).

From: November 21, 2017

James encouraged a mutual accountability among believers in prayer. This level of fellowship is rare in the church today, but is much needed. Healing in body, soul and relationships is experienced when believers are honest about their needs, weaknesses, and sins in prayers together.
 
Do you have one or two close friends of the same gender that you share mutual accountability and prayers with? Do you meet regularly? Gathering together regularly and authentically is “effective.” And doing so fervently “avails much.”

“And behold, the glory of the God of Israel was coming from the east. And the sound of his coming was like the sound of many waters, and the earth shone with his glory.” (Ezekiel 43:2 ESV)

From: November 21, 2016

The prophet Ezekiel saw a vision of a new Temple, one yet to be built. In this vision, the Spirit led him to the Eastern Gate, “And behold,” he saw the glory of God “coming from the east.” This is the same direction by which he had seen God’s glory depart in his earlier vision (Ez.10-11). This “glory” can be none other than the Messiah, Jesus Christ. As John declared, “We beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14). For Christ is “the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature” (Heb. 1:3). What Ezekiel saw and heard in his vision, John saw and heard with even greater detail in his vision on the Isle of Patmos. John said that His voice was as “the sound of many waters” (Rev. 1:15) and that His face shone “like the sun shining in its strength” (Rev. 1:16). There is a Day coming when we too shall see and hear Him for ourselves. Therefore, stay alert, watch and pray. He is coming again “from the east.”

“Is anyone among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord” (James 5:14 NKJV)

From: November 21, 2015

An often overlooked resource in the modern church. Having available modern medicine, we forget the benefit of prayer and laying on of hands. Yet, the Bible says that having the elders in the church pray for you and anoint you is the proper response when you are sick. In our materialistic view of the world, we forget the spiritual component to health and wholeness. We forget that we are more than physical beings. However, real healing must involve the whole self. The church has always been deeply involved with caring for the sick. Throughout history, wherever the church has gone, it has built schools and hospitals because it recognizes that the need to care for the whole self, is to care for mind, soul, and body. So, keep going to the doctor, but don’t forget to have the church praying for you too.

“Son of man, describe to the people of Israel the Temple I have shown you, so they will be ashamed of all their sins” (Ezekiel 43:10 NLT)

From: November 21, 2014

God revealed His purpose for describing a future temple to Ezekiel (referred to here as “Son of man”). Ezekiel’s temple has never been built. Solomon built the first, which was destroyed by the Babylonians, as Ezekiel’s prophecy predicted. Zerubbabel built the second, which was enlarged by Herod the Great, but destroyed by the Romans in 70 AD. Ezekiel’s temple is sometimes called the “Third Temple,” or the “Millennial Temple.” Depending on one’s eschatology, some would see it as describing a spiritual temple fulfilled by the church. Others would see a literal fulfillment in the last days or during the Millennial kingdom. Regardless, Ezekiel was to describe it, so that the people of Israel would be “ashamed of all their sins.” Shame is an appropriate response to sin. Yet, there is a hardening of the heart which reduces shame to a dull tickling and then a complete denial. Ezekiel was to describe God’s future temple and returning glory, so that their hearts would feel shame, turning to God in repentance for forgiveness and salvation.

“I will delight in your statutes; I will not forget your word” (Psalm 119:16)

From: November 21, 2013

Psalm 119 is the longest chapter in the Bible. For those who know “Bible Drill,” it is near the center (excluding notes and concordance), which is helpful. It is an acrostic, with each stanza beginning with one of the 22 Hebrew letters in the alphabet (aleph, beth, gimel…). It uses many synonyms to describe God’s Word and is a celebration and praise of it. Above, you will notice it uses “statutes” and “word.” It seems appropriate that at the very center, the longest chapter in the Word, would be about, for, and in celebration of the Word.

“I have hidden your word in my heart, that I might not sin against you” (Psalm 119:11)

From: November 21, 2012

From the longest chapter in the Bible, found at the very center of the Book, this Psalm is an acrostic poem that spells out the 22-letter Hebrew alphabet. Psalm 119 celebrates God’s Word. Verse 11 reminds us of the importance of “hiding” the Word in our hearts through memorization. It also offers the benefit of such, by showing us how Scripture can help us resist sin. Wasn’t that the battle plan of Jesus vs. Satan in Matt. 4? Christ quoted Scripture to every Satanic temptation. Are you hiding God’s Word in your heart?