November 11

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“So do not throw away this confident trust in the Lord. Remember the great reward it brings you!” (Hebrews 10:35 NLT).

From: November 11, 2018

DON’T THROW AWAY YOUR SHIELD OF FAITH
After a season of suffering we are tempted to timidity and cowardice. We fear persecution and pain, so we hide from the fight. We lose a battle, so we retreat from the war. Yet, the Word teaches us not to “throw away” our “confident trust,” which is the boldness of faith.
 
There is a metaphoric reference here that compares losing one’s boldness to a soldier who throws away his shield. It is said that certain Greek mothers, when they gave shields to their sons, would say, “Either bring this back, or be brought back upon it.” Thus urging their sons to be bold in battle and in protecting their family and tribe. The captains of armies often urged their soldiers to beat their swords against their shields and shout in preparation for an assault. Thus building up their own confidence, while striking fear in the enemy.
 
Faithful soldiers do not throw away their shields. Nor do faithful believers cast aside their boldness. Faithful believers persevere, remembering the great reward that the Captain of our faith brings with Him at His coming.

“Do not keep silent, O God of my praise!” (Psalm 109:1 NKJV).

From: November 11, 2017

David began his psalm with a prayer that the Lord would no longer “keep silent.” No doubt he had read the book of Job and knew how the Lord’s voice silenced Job’s accusers. David was being attacked by false accusers, yet the Lord remained seemingly silent.
 
When we try to defend ourselves against false accusation it usually has the opposite effect. People love the lie more than the truth. And when we sound defensive, we sound guilty. But when God speaks, the accusations are silenced because the false accusers are silenced.
 
Ask the Lord to speak on your behalf. Pray as the first century church did, “Lord, look on their threats, and grant to Your servants that with all boldness they may speak Your word” (Acts 4:29). In other words, “Lord, you speak to those who falsely accuse us, while we continue to speak Your Word and praise Your name!”

“let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water” (Hebrews 10:22 ESV)

From: November 11, 2016

Since Jesus has become our Great High Priest and has accomplished all that is necessary for those who trust in Him to approach the Father, “let us draw near.” Christ has removed the barrier of separation between us and God. Why stand off afar? Draw near. And let your approach be with “full assurance,” not doubting. Knowing that your hearts have been cleansed by the sprinkling of the blood of Jesus and your bodies are being washed, sanctified by the work of the Spirit, come near to God with full confidence. Jesus has done this for you, so… draw near.

“Their names: Oholah the elder and Oholibah her sister; They were Mine, And they bore sons and daughters. As for their names, Samaria is Oholah, and Jerusalem is Oholibah” (Ezekiel 23:4 NKJV)

From: November 11, 2015

The Ezekiel passage today about the two adulterous sisters graphically illustrates how God (as the covenantal husband to Israel) felt about the idolatry of Israel (Samaria) and Judah (Jerusalem). After the death of King Solomon, Israel became a divided kingdom. The Northern kingdom called Israel moved its capital to Samaria. They were later conquered by the Assyrians. The Southern kingdom called Judah continued some years after the fall of Israel. The Babylonians conquered Judah whose capital city was Jerusalem. Ezekiel was among those deported from Jerusalem to Babylon during the second deportation. He prophesied that even though Jerusalem had witnessed Samaria’s sin, it didn’t hinder her idolatry. So, God would judge her as He had Samaria.

“Let us think of ways to motivate one another to acts of love and good works” (Hebrews 10:24 NLT)

From: November 11, 2014

How can we “motivate one another?” By reminding one another of our full access to the Father through Christ’s sacrifice and by acknowledging our unwavering hope for the future because of God’s promise in Christ. Meeting together regularly for worship and mutual encouragement fans the flame of our passion for God. With power for the present, hope for the future and mutual encouragement, we are free to love and do the good works that God planned for us in Christ.

“Let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near” (Hebrews 10:24-25)

From: November 11, 2013

Like the antelope that wanders off from the herd on its own and is eaten by the lion, so is the vulnerability of the believer who begins to isolate from gathering with other believers. Being stirred up to “love and good works” may disturb us, but it is necessary for our growth and maturity.

BTW, the Ezekiel passage today about the two adulterous sisters was rated R for sure. But it graphically illustrates how God (as the covenantal husband to Israel)

From: November 11, 2009

felt about the idolatry of Israel (Samaria) and Judah (Jerusalem).
After the death of King Solomon, Israel became a divided kingdom. The Northern kingdom called Israel moved its capital to Samaria. They were later conquered by the Assyrians. The Southern kingdom called Judah continued some years after the fall of Israel. The Babylonians conquered Judah whose capital city was Jerusalem.
Ezekiel’s prophecy came true.