May 6

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“Then the women of the town said to Naomi, ‘Praise the Lord, who has now provided a redeemer for your family! May this child be famous in Israel'” (Ruth 4:14 NLT).

From: May 6, 2019

JESUS, THE FAMOUS ONE

The little book of Ruth illustrates the use of the Levitical law (found in Lev. 25) which provided for a woman who had no male heir to retain her family’s property. This provision in the law called for a close family member to become a “ga’al” (גָּאַל), which is Hebrew for “kinsman-redeemer.” In Ruth, Boaz willingly takes on the role of the ga’al, a selfless act that enabled Naomi and Ruth not only to have an inheritance but gave them a son to carry on the name of their dead son and husband.
 
It seems ironic that it was a foreign woman who activated this law. Yet, God often brings people that are far away, near to Him in faith. The story of Boaz and Ruth not only illustrates for us the love, beauty and self-sacrifice of the kinsman-redeemer practice. It prepares us for the appearance of the ultimate Kinsman-Redeemer, Jesus Christ, who is the son of David, son of Jesse, son of Obed, son of Boaz and Ruth, and the eternal Son of God. He is the ultimate fulfillment of the women’s blessing. Jesus is the Famous One. (I’m hearing the Chris Tomlin song by the same name in my head right now)
 
PRAYER: Dear Lord, thank you for Jesus. He is our Kinsman-Redeemer. Because of Him we are adopted into Your family as children of God. Jesus is the Famous One! Empower us to make Him even more famous today as we bear witness of Him to all that we meet. In Jesus’ name, amen.

‘Jesus asked, “Will you never believe in me unless you see miraculous signs and wonders?”’ (John 4:48 NLT).

From: May 6, 2018

FAITH IN THE PERSON NOT THE PERFORMANCE
A government official from Capernaum came to Jesus in Galilee desperately begging Him to come to heal his son. Jesus pointed out that it wasn’t the man’s faith in Him that moved the man to travel to Galilee, but his hope that Jesus could heal his son. Jesus wanted the man to put his faith in His person, not His performance. So, Jesus sent the man home with the promise that his son would live. The man believed Jesus and immediately went home where he found his son alive and well.
 
In John’s gospel, Christ’s miracles are called “signs.” For miracles attract, but signs point. Jesus always called people to see His miracles as signs that pointed to His deity, to His identity as the Christ and Savior of the world. Many came to Jesus that He might feed them bread, but only a few had the faith to see Christ Himself as the Bread of Life.
 
Do you believe in Jesus for who He is, or for what He can hopefully do for you? Do you seek His face before His hand?

“This again is the second sign Jesus did when He had come out of Judea into Galilee” (John 4:54 NKJV).

From: May 6, 2017

The gospel of John recorded seven “signs” of Jesus. These were miracles, yet John chose to call them “signs” because he wanted to emphasize their purpose, namely, that they pointed to Jesus as the Messiah, the Son of God.
 
John wrote, “Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of the disciples, which are not written in this book; but these are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name” (John 20:30-31).
 
John wanted his readers to take their eyes off of the miracles and put them on the Miracle-worker, Jesus. In this second sign, Jesus healed the nobleman’s son in Cana without even going to see him. He healed him with a word. And the nobleman, an officer of the king, believed in Jesus as his true King from that day forward.

“Blessed be the Lord, who has not left you this day without a redeemer, and may his name be renowned in Israel!” (Ruth 4:14 ESV)

From: May 6, 2016

The little book of Ruth is unique. Only one of two books in the Bible named for a woman, it is considered one of the great literary works of the Bible. It is a book about faith, love and redemption. It illustrates the application of the redemption law as found in Leviticus 25, which provided for a woman who had no male heir to retain her family’s property. This provision in the law called for a close family member to become a “go’el,” which is the Hebrew word for “kinsman-redeemer.” In Ruth, a man named Boaz takes the role of the “go’el,” a selfless act that enabled Naomi and Ruth to not only have an inheritance, but gave them a son to carry on the name of their dead son and husband. It seems ironic that it was a foreign woman who activated this law. Yet, God loves to draw those far away, near to Him in faith. So, the love story of Boaz and Ruth informs us of the kinsman-redeemer practice and also prepares us for the ultimate Kinsman-Redeemer, Jesus Christ.

“Then the women said to Naomi, ‘Blessed be the Lord, who has not left you this day without a close relative'” (Ruth 4:14 NKJV)

From: May 6, 2015

The little books of Ruth and Jonah have much in common. Four chapters, literary works of art, easily seen as 4-act plays, and more… But more profound is that they both foreshadow great doctrines of redemption. Both books show how God’s message of salvation is for non-Jews too. In Jonah it’s the Ninevites and in Ruth it’s a Moabite. Jonah’s 3-days in the fish foreshadows Christ’s time in the tomb and resurrection. And Ruth’s redemption by Boaz foreshadows Christ’s redemption of all who come to Him. In Boaz, we see the Hebrew “kinsman-redeemer,” — the one according to Levitical law that was to redeem a deceased kin’s wife and property. This foreshadows Christ redeeming His bride, which is the Church. The redeemed Moabitess Ruth became the great grandmother of David, and therefore in the line of Jesus. And Naomi (meaning “pleasant”), who had changed her name to Mara (“bitter”), was happier than ever! Now that’s amazing redemption!

“Then the women of the town said to Naomi, ‘Praise the Lord, who has now provided a redeemer for your family! May this child be famous in Israel'” (Ruth 4:14 NLT)

From: May 6, 2014

The little book of Ruth illustrates the use of the Levitical law (found in Lev. 25) which provided for a woman who had no male heir to retain her family’s property. This provision in the law called for a close family member to become a “ga’al,” which is the Hebrew word for “kinsman-redeemer.” In Ruth, Boaz takes the role of the ga’al, a selfless act that enabled Naomi and Ruth not only to have an inheritance but gave them a son to carry on the name of their dead son and husband. It seems ironic that it was a foreign woman who activated this law. Yet, God often brings people that are far away, near to Him in faith. So, the story of Boaz and Ruth inform us of the kinsman-redeemer practice and also show us the preparation for the ultimate Kinsman-Redeemer, Jesus Christ, son of David, son of Jesse… Obed… Boaz and Ruth, and the Son of God.

“I am Ruth, your servant. Spread your wings over your servant, for you are a redeemer” (Ruth 3:9 ESV)

From: May 6, 2013

The little books of Ruth and Jonah have much in common. Four chapters, literary works of art, easily seen as 4-act plays, and more… But more profound is that they both foreshadow great doctrines of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Both books show how God’s message of salvation is for non-Jews too. In Jonah it’s the Ninevites. In Ruth it’s the Moabite. Jonah’s 3-days in the fish foreshadows Christ’s time in the tomb and resurrection. And Ruth’s redemption by Boaz foreshadows Christ’s redemption of all who come to Him. In Boaz, we see the Hebrew “kinsman-redeemer,” — the one according to Levitical law that was to redeem a deceased kin’s wife and property. The Hebrew word is “ga’al,” and foreshadows Christ redeeming His bride, which is the Church. The redeemed Moabitess Ruth became the great grandmother of David, and therefore in the line of Jesus. Now that’s amazing redemption!