March 22

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‘”So I will prove to you that the Son of Man has the authority on earth to forgive sins.” Then Jesus turned to the paralyzed man and said, “Stand up, pick up your mat, and go home!”’ (Luke 5:24 NLT).

From: March 22, 2018

CHRIST’S MIRACLES ARE PROOFS OF HIS DIVINITY
The Pharisees were upset by Jesus telling a paralyzed man that his sins were forgiven. They said to themselves that he had committed blasphemy because only God had the authority to forgive sins. Jesus knew their thoughts, so he asked them which is easier to say ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or ‘Stand up and walk’? Then, without pause, he commanded the paralyzed man to stand up and walk. He said that this miracle should “prove” his authority as the “Son of Man” (A Messianic title).
 
Jesus offered many “proofs” of His divinity. That’s why the apostle John called Christ’s miracles, “signs” in his gospel. Sign’s don’t point to themselves. They identify the place, person or thing. Jesus’ miracles were signs pointing to His identity as the Messiah, both Son of Man and Son of God. They were proofs that He had the authority of God because He is God.

“Therefore do not defile the land which you inhabit, in the midst of which I dwell; for I the Lord dwell among the children of Israel” (Numbers 35:34 NKJV).

From: March 22, 2017

What would “defile the land?”
 
The blood of unatoned murder is a defilement of any land. Not just the murder itself, but the murder that isn’t justly punished. As the Lord told Cain after he murdered his brother, “Your brother’s blood cries out to Me from the ground” (Gen. 4:10).
 
The Lord gave authority to human government to both limit and punish sin. As the apostle Paul wrote to the Romans, The ruler “does not bear the sword in vain; for he is God’s minister, an avenger to execute wrath on him who practices evil.” The Lord will not long dwell with a nation that does not execute justice.

“And Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I will; be clean.” And immediately the leprosy left him.” (Luke 5:13 ESV)

From: March 22, 2016

A man “full of leprosy” fell on his face before Jesus saying, “Lord if you are will, you can make me clean.” And the Lord, who could’ve healed from afar, came near and touched the man who was leprous all over and said, “I will, be clean.” Jesus was not only willing to heal the leper, he was willing to touch him. The first action demonstrated divine power, the second divine love. Certainly, we rejoice in Christ’s healing and forgiving power that saves us. Yet, that Jesus is willing to touch us, calling us his own, moves us to even greater thankfulness and joy. He is not only Physician, but Friend!

“So He Himself often withdrew into the wilderness and prayed” (Luke 5:16 NKJV)

From: March 22, 2015

The more that crowds gathered around Jesus, the more often He “withdrew” to pray. Jesus modeled an important rhythm between doing ministry and personal devotion. We recognize the need for food and rest for our physical bodies after exerting work, but we often overlook the need for our souls to be replenished after doing ministry. Do you ever withdraw to pray?

“Though we are overwhelmed by our sins, you forgive them all” (Psalm 65:3 NLT)

From: March 22, 2014

When we confess Jesus as Lord and believe in our hearts that he died for sins, was buried and raised from the dead, we are saved. In that very moment, we have been saved from sin’s penalty (justification), we are being saved from sin’s power (sanctification), and we will be saved from sin’s presence (glorification). So, when we receive Christ’s payment for our sins, how many of our sins are forgiven? Past ones? Present? What about tomorrow? The answer: In Christ, God forgives “them all.” For this, the apostle Paul exulted, “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit” (Romans 8:1).

“But he would withdraw to desolate places and pray” (Luke 5:16 ESV)

From: March 22, 2013

The more that crowds gathered around Jesus, the more often He would “withdraw” to pray. Jesus modeled an important rhythm between doing ministry and personal devotion. We recognize the need for food and rest for our physical bodies after exerting work, but we often overlook the need for our souls to be replenished after doing ministry. Do you ever withdraw to pray?