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March 19

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“My soul, wait silently for God alone, for my expectation is from Him. He only is my rock and my salvation; He is my defense; I shall not be moved” (Psalms 62:5-6 NKJV).

From: March 19, 2020

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO WAIT SILENTLY FOR GOD ALONE?

David instructed his soul to wait silently for God alone. Perhaps his soul was feeling impatient and anxious. The two often go hand in hand. Impatience leads to worry, which leads to questions and doubts. David knew this, so he stilled his own soul, reminding himself of who God is. Depending on the Lord, he confidently declared that nothing could move him or shake him loose from God’s protection and care.
 
Are you becoming impatient in these difficult days? Has your impatience led to a “noisy soul,” an inner voice that constantly speaks with a questioning and anxious sound? Remember the fruit of the Spirit includes several important helps for us, especially at times like these. A recipe for a quiet soul that waits on the Lord must include some of these ingredients: “love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control” (Gal. 5:22-23).
 
Which of these might we exercise today to help quiet our soul and wait silently for the Lord? “Self-control” would help us command our inner life to be quiet, much like Jesus commanded the storm, “Peace, be still.” And speaking of “peace,” we certainly could use a large dose of that today. But let’s not forget “longsuffering,” which is Christian patience, for the Spirit that lives within us gives us great perseverance through difficulty and suffering.
 
As believers, the quiet patience of the Spirit dwells within us, so we are able to speak to our own souls as David did and not only that we are able in Jesus’ name, to speak a word of, “Peace, be still” to the world around us too.
 
PRAYER: Dear Father, we wait patiently and quietly for You today, knowing that You are in control. You are our Rock and Savior, our Defender. We shall not be moved. In Jesus’ name, amen.

“You must present these offerings to the Lord at your annual festivals…” (Numbers 28:39 NLT).

From: March 19, 2019

REMEMBERING AND CELEBRATING WHAT GOD HAS DONE

Reading through all the instructions concerning offerings and festivals in the Old Testament is pretty overwhelming. It seems impossible to keep up with them all. Yet, God was teaching His people to remember Him and what He had done for them. These holy-days/holidays were meant for remembrance, worship and to remind them of their identity as one people belonging to God. In Numbers 28, the following holiday/festivals are mentioned:
 
– PASSOVER (Hebrew: פסח Pesach): Which commemorates the story of the Exodus, also called The Feast of Unleavened Bread. Takes place in the Hebrew month of Nisan (Mar/Apr).
 
-FESTIVAL OF HARVEST (Hebrew: שבועות Shavuot): Also called The Festival of Weeks and The Festival of Pentecost. It commemorates the anniversary of the day God gave the Torah. Begins at sundown in the month of Sivan (May/June).
 
– FESTIVAL OF TRUMPETS (Hebrew: ראש השנה Rosh Hashanah, literally “head of the year”): is the 7th month in the biblical account, but became the first month of the Jewish New Year. It is celebrated by the sounding of the shofar (trumpets). It begins at sundown on Tishri 1 (Sept/Oct).
 
– DAY OF ATONEMENT (Heb: יום כפור Yom Kippur): It is the holiest day of the year for the Jews. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Begins at sundown on Tishri 10 (Sept/Oct).
 
– FESTIVAL OF SHELTERS (Heb. סוכות Sukkot): Also called The Feast of Booths and The Feast of Tabernacles. It commemorates the way the Israelites were sustained by God in the wilderness for 40 years living in tents. Takes place on Tishri 15-22 (Sept/Oct).
 
The Jewish holidays of Hanukkah and Purim were not named in the Torah. Hanukkah commemorates the rededication during the 2nd century B.C. of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, where God miraculously caused the holy oil in the Temple lamps to last until more could be made. Purim commemorates God’s protection of the Jews as told in the book of Esther.
 
PRAYER: Lord, thank you for the miraculous way you have protected and provided for your people throughout the ages. We especially thank you for Jesus, our Lord and Savior. May we never forget to remember and celebrate all that you have done for us. In Jesus’ name, amen.

“Jesus was about thirty years old when he began his public ministry” (Luke 3:23 NLT).

From: March 19, 2018

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THIRTY YEARS
With the exception of the birth accounts in Matthew and Luke and the twelve-year old in the Temple account in Luke, the gospels contain little detail about Jesus before thirty. All four gospels focus their attention on Christ’s ministry that began with His baptism at thirty and concluded with the cross, the tomb and the ascension three years later. So, why was it significant for Jesus to begin His public ministry at age thirty?
 
Perhaps these examples from Scripture will shed light on this question:
1) Joseph was thirty when he began serving as Pharoah’s second-in-command over Egypt (Gen. 41:46).
2) Levite priests began their public ministry at age thirty (Ex. 4:3).
3) David became king at age thirty (2 Sam. 5:4).
4) Ezekiel the prophet saw his first vision at thirty (Ez. 1:1).
 
While the Bible doesn’t answer our question directly, perhaps we might infer by example and type that thirty is the biblical age for one to be publicly acknowledged as a prophet, priest or king. For in Jesus, we see all three offices fulfilled.
 
It was on my thirtieth birthday that I first studied these Scriptures and finally answered the call of God that had been on my life since I was a boy.

“So Moses told the children of Israel everything, just as the Lord commanded Moses” (Numbers 29:40 NKJV).

From: March 19, 2017

Moses was a faithful servant to the Lord. He passed along “everything” that the Lord had commanded him to say to the children of Israel. He did not add to, nor subtract from, nor water down the Word of the Lord. He told them all, just as the Lord had said to him. The Lord commended him for this.
 
Where is the witness for Christ today that would say all that the Lord has told them? Where is the expositor that would preach the whole Word of God? Where is one that would be faithful like Moses in communicating everything that God has commanded?

“For God alone, O my soul, wait in silence, for my hope is from him” (Psalm 62:5 ESV)

From: March 19, 2016

David knew how to get alone with God and find hope and encouragement from Him. He was careful to silence his own self-talk and listen for the voice of the Lord. When we allow the voice of worry (anxious self-talk) to fill our heads, discouragement abounds. At times like this we can say to ourselves, “Be quiet soul, wait and listen for God to speak.” For our hope is anchored not in our own ability, but in God’s power.

” Now Jesus Himself began His ministry at about thirty years of age, being (as was supposed)

From: March 19, 2015

the son of Joseph, the son of Heli…” (Luke 3:23 NKJV).
Some point to the differences between the two genealogies found in Matthew and Luke as evidence of error in the Bible. However, the better explanation is that Matthew and Luke were writing from different perspectives. Matthew’s gospel presented Christ as King, while Luke’s presented him as Son of Man. Matthew followed the line of Joseph (Jesus’ legal father), through David’s son Solomon, while Luke followed the line of Mary (Jesus’ blood relative), though David’s son Nathan. Since there was no Greek word for “son-in-law,” Joseph was called the “son of Heli” by marriage to Mary, Heli’s daughter. Through either Mary’s or Joseph’s line, Jesus is a descendant of David. Tracing a genealogy through the mother’s side is unusual, but so was the virgin birth. Luke’s explanation is that Jesus was the son of Joseph, “as was supposed.” Matthew’s genealogy started with Abraham and ended with Jesus, showing his legal right to the Davidic throne, while Luke began with Jesus and traced his humanity all the way back to Adam and to God.

“You must present these offerings to the Lord at your annual festivals…” (Numbers 28:39 NLT)

From: March 19, 2014

Reading through all the instructions concerning offerings and festivals in the Old Testament is pretty overwhelming. It seems impossible to keep up with them all. Yet, God was teaching His people to remember Him and what He had done for them. These holy-days/holidays were meant for remembrance, worship and to remind them of their identity as one people belonging to God. In Numbers 28, the following holiday/festivals are mentioned:
– Passover (Hebrew: פסח Pesach): Which commemorates the story of the Exodus, also called The Feast of Unleavened Bread. Begins on April 14th at sundown this year.
– Festival of Harvest (Hebrew: שבועות Shavuot): Also called The Festival of Weeks and The Festival of Pentecost. It commemorates the anniversary of the day God gave the Torah. This year it begins at sundown on June 3rd.
– Festival of Trumpets (Hebrew: ראש השנה Rosh Hashanah, literally “head of the year”): is the Jewish New Year. It is celebrated by the sounding of the shofar (trumpets). This year it begins at sundown on Sept 24th.
– Day of Atonement (Heb: יום כפור Yom Kippur): It is the holiest day of the year for the Jews. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. This year it begins at sundown on Oct 3rd.
– Festival of Shelters (Heb. סוכות Sukkot): Also called The Feast of Booths and The Feast of Tabernacles. This year it begins at sundown on Oct. 8th.

“For God alone, O my soul, wait in silence, for my hope is from him” (Psalm 62:5 ESV)

From: March 19, 2013

David knew how to get alone with God and find hope and encouragement from Him. He was careful to silence his own self-talk and listen for the voice of the Lord. When we allow the voice of worry (anxious self-talk) to fill our heads, discouragement abounds. At times like this we can say to ourselves, “Be quiet soul, wait and listen for God to speak.”

“I wait quietly before God, for my victory comes from him” (Psalm 62:1)

From: March 19, 2012

David trusted God for the victory in his life. How do you define victory or success? How could waiting quietly before God possibly have anything to do with succeeding? Only those who recognize that knowing and pleasing God is the highest success will understand David’s prayer.

“Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him” (Psalm 62:5)

From: March 19, 2011

Even our work should come from a place of rest knowing that Christ has finished the work of our salvation. All is well. Rest in Him.