July 10

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“So take courage! For I believe God. It will be just as he said” (Acts 27:25 NLT).

From: July 10, 2019

PAUL’S THREE ENCOURAGING FAITH STATEMENTS

The ship taking Paul to Rome for his appeal to Caesar was caught up in a great storm and in danger of sinking. But God sent an angel to encourage Paul that although they would suffer shipwreck, no one on board would drown. All would be saved. Paul encouraged the others on the ship with the word the Lord had given him.
 
Paul’s three faith statements are encouraging to consider:
1) “Take courage” – Put away fear and be encouraged.
2) “I believe God” – Paul declared his firm faith in God.
3) “It will be just as He said” – He declared his faith in God’s Word.
 
Try saying these three statements the next time you are facing one of life’s storms.
 
PRAYER: Lord, we believe in You. So we choose to be strong and courageous in You because You are always with us and never leave us. Help us also to encourage those around us with our firm faith in You and in Your Word. In Jesus’ name, amen.

“The soldiers wanted to kill the prisoners to make sure they didn’t swim ashore and escape. But the commanding officer wanted to spare Paul, so he didn’t let them carry out their plan” (Acts 27:42-43 NLT).

From: July 10, 2018

MIRACLE ON THE MED
When it appeared that Paul and the 276 people aboard the ship would survive the storm, he and his fellow prisoners were threatened by the soldiers. Yet, even in this, God protected Paul, giving him favor with the commanding officer. The storm, the sailors and the soldiers, all at different times, threatened Paul’s life, but God intervened every time. Not only did Paul survive, but all 276 passengers did as well. Many a ship and all aboard have lost their lives in lesser storms on the Mediterranean Sea, but God had called Paul to go to Rome, and to Rome he would go. The miracle on the Med gave Paul a platform to preach the gospel to every passenger with great credibility.

“A man who has friends must himself be friendly, But there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother.” (Proverbs 18:24 NKJV).

From: July 10, 2017

Another way of reading this proverb might be: “A man may have many fair-weathered ‘friends,’ but it is rare to have one who remains with him when trouble comes.”
 
Such a friend is rare indeed, for he “sticks closer” than his own family. Jesus is such a friend. As He told his disciples, “Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends” (John 15:13). Jesus demonstrated this love when He died for us on the cross. O, what a Friend we have in Jesus!

“And when he had said these things, he took bread, and giving thanks to God in the presence of all he broke it and began to eat. Then they all were encouraged and ate some food themselves.” (Acts 27:35-36 ESV)

From: July 10, 2016

Paul’s status changed from prisoner to priest and from accused criminal to acting captain as everyone aboard the storm-driven ship began to listen to him. Although others may disregard our Christian testimony or even demean it, when storms come they often turn to the one who knows the Lord. This is what happened to Paul. Both the sailors and the soldiers were encouraged to hear his words.

“When I consider Your heavens, the work of Your fingers, The moon and the stars, which You have ordained, What is man that You are mindful of him, and the son of man that You visit him?” (Psalm 8:3-4 NKJV)

From: July 10, 2015

The psalmist David wondered at the immensity and beauty of the night sky in comparison to the small stature of humanity. He posed a rhetorical question concerning God’s care for man, then answers it in the psalm with observations about man’s creation and authority under God. We can almost picture David gazing at the night sky and writing this meditation. Putting the words to music, he opened and closed the psalm with praise of God’s majesty. “O Lord, our Lord,” he wrote, moving attention from the great Creator (O Lord) to the personal Redeemer of Israel (our Lord). For the Lord God is both transcendent and immanent. He is omnipotent and holy, yet personal and present. The God who made everything cares for you.

“When I look at the night sky and see the work of your fingers— the moon and the stars you set in place— what are mere mortals that you should think about them, human beings that you should care for them?” (Psalm 8:3-4 NLT)

From: July 10, 2014

The psalmist David wondered at the immensity and beauty of the night sky in comparison to the small stature of humanity. He poses a rhetorical question concerning God’s care for man, then answers it in the psalm with observations about man’s creation and authority under God. We can almost picture David gazing at the night sky and writing this meditation. Putting the words to music, he opens and closes the psalm with praise of God’s majesty. “O Lord, our Lord,” he writes, moving his attention from the great Creator (O Lord) to the personal Redeemer of Israel (our Lord). For the Lord God is both transcendent and immanent. He is omnipotent and holy, yet personal and present. The God who made everything cares for you.

“‘God in his goodness has granted safety to everyone sailing with you.’ So take courage! For I believe God. It will be just as he said” (Acts 27:24-25)

From: July 10, 2012

Although a prisoner in chains, the apostle Paul became the spiritual leader of all those on board this ship caught in a terrible storm. The sailors, the soldiers, even the Roman centurion were all encouraged by Paul’s faith. The way we respond to life’s storms is often the platform God uses to give us authority to preach the gospel and to bring glory to Himself.

“From the lips of children and infants you have ordained praise” (Psalm 8:2)

From: July 10, 2011

Even though God is great, He has chosen little children to praise Him. He has ordained that the weak would silence the strength of His enemies. He laughs at those we consider great and bends His ear to a child’s praise. Teach your children to praise the Lord, your grandchildren to lift up His name.