January 28

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“Moses was eighty years old, and Aaron was eighty-three when they made their demands to Pharaoh” (Exodus 7:7 NLT).

From: January 28, 2019

THE MOSES’ RETIREMENT PLAN

The life of Moses can be divided into three 40-year phases. The first 40 years of his life, he lived as a prince of Egypt, the second, as a shepherd in Midian, and the third, as the deliverer of Israel. It took 80 years for God to get Moses prepared to deliver His people. That’s a long education. Yet finally, he was both humble and obedient enough for God to use. The last 40 years of his life were devoted to being God’s man, leading Israel out of Egypt and into the land of Canaan. The most powerful and productive years of Moses’ life were the years after 80. For he gave his life completely over to God.
 
What’s your plan for life after 80? You’re never too old or too young for a God-sized calling to capture your life!
 
PRAYER: Lord, we want to continually say ‘yes’ to the calling you have on our life. We don’t want to waste one minute of the life You have given us. We turn every area of our lives over to You. We are Your servants. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

“Moses was eighty years old, and Aaron was eighty-three when they made their demands to Pharaoh” (Exodus 7:7 NLT).

From: January 28, 2018

MOSES AT 80
The life of Moses can be divided into three 40-year phases. The first 40 he lived as a prince of Egypt, the second, as a shepherd in Midian, and the third, as the deliverer of Israel. It took 80 years to get Moses prepared to deliver God’s people. That’s a long education. Yet finally, he was both humble and obedient enough for God to use. The last 40 years of his life were devoted to being God’s man, leading Israel out of Egypt and into the land of Canaan.
 
What do plan to do with you life after 80?

“His own iniquities entrap the wicked man, And he is caught in the cords of his sin” (Proverbs 5:22 NKJV).

From: January 28, 2017

Why is there suffering in God’s creation? Humanity has rebelled and chosen its own way. And the whole world has fallen under sin’s sway. Sin begins as an attitude of self-will that wants its own way, rather than God’s way. So, sin is an offense against God, but it is also harmful to the one sinning. A father may tell his toddler not to touch the hot stove, but when the toddler touches it anyway, the father need not punish. The blistered hand is punishment enough. Yet, the day of judgment is coming when all sinners will be judged. Until then, sin itself is already at work in the sinner. For it entraps and entangles, enslaving and deluding, slowly squeezing the life out of the sinner hypnotized by its stare and strangled by its coils. Thank God there is a Savior, One who came to break the bonds of sin and set us free! Thank God for Jesus who not only releases us from sin’s snare, but also adopts us into the Father’s family. Those who have received Christ as Savior and Lord are no longer entrapped and caught in the cords of sin.

“ He restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake” (Psalm 23:3 ESV)

From: January 28, 2016

From David’s famous shepherd psalm. Those that follow the Lord are led on right paths by Him. God does this for the sake of His own Name. God’s purpose is to make us righteous like His Son, who declared “I am the Good Shepherd” (John 10:11). In this leading, God cares more for our character than our comfort. He is not working in us for our pleasure, for our name, but for His Name. Therefore, we do not fear when we walk through the valley of the shadow of death, because the Good Shepherd is with us, and His purpose is sure. God is making us like His Son (1 John 3:2).

“Then Peter came to Him and said, ‘Lord, how often shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? Up to seven times?'” (Matthew 18:21 NKJV)

From: January 28, 2015

Peter asked Jesus whether we should put a limit on forgiveness. Jesus answered with a parable concerning a king and his subject who owed him “ten thousand talents” (A “talent” was a unit of gold weighing around 75 pounds. One talent was equal to about 16 years’ wages). The king forgave his subject completely, erasing his debt. But the subject’s heart was unchanged. He immediately went out and put in prison one who owed him only “one hundred denarii” (A “denarii” was a Roman coin made of about 4 grams of silver. It was considered a day’s wages). The point of the parable seems to be that God has forgiven us a debt much greater than any could ever repay, therefore we should always forgive because we have been forgiven so much. Our capacity for the forgiveness of others is drawn from God’s limitless supply of forgiveness for us. We are to love and forgive unconditionally, as God through Christ has loved and forgiven us.

“The Lord is my shepherd; I have all that I need” (Psalm 23:1)

From: January 28, 2014

This Davidic psalm is so well known in the KJV that it’s difficult to read it any other version (“…I shall not want.”). Yet, as comforting as the familiar KJV verse is, sometimes it’s helpful to read it in another version to help unpack its meaning. Here, the NLT reading caused me to focus on the Lord as my shepherd more than my wants/needs. In other words, all my true and deepest needs are satisfied in the Lord Himself. I still prefer the beautiful KJV for most of my memorization work, but occasionally another version causes me to see Scripture afresh. Here’s my paraphrase as a result of today’s reading: “I have the Lord as my shepherd, so what else could I possibly need?”

“He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake” (Psalm 23:3)

From: January 28, 2013

From David’s famous shepherd psalm. Those that follow the Lord are led on right paths by Him. God does this for the sake of His own Name. God’s purpose is to make us righteous like His Son, who declared “I am the Good Shepherd” (John 10:11). In this leading, God cares more for our character than our comfort. He is not working in us for our pleasure, for our name, but for His Name. Therefore, we do not fear when we walk through the valley of the shadow of death, because the Good Shepherd is with us, and His purpose is sure. God is making us like His Son (1 John 3:2).

“Jesus replied, ‘Moses permitted divorce only as a concession to your hard hearts, but it was not what God had originally intended'” (Matthew 19:8)

From: January 28, 2012

National statistics show that Christians are now just as likely to be divorced as non-believers. This shows the disconnect between our faith and our faithfulness. Should Christians suffer from “hardened hearts?” (As it turns out, this statistic was reported in error. Recent book by Shaunti Feldhahn, “Good News About Marriage”)