February 3

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“My heart has heard you say, “Come and talk with me.” And my heart responds, “Lord, I am coming.” (Psalm 27:8 NLT).

From: February 3, 2019

THE LORD WHO SPEAKS TO OUR HEARTS

It is the Spirit of the Lord that pursues us. He whispers to our hearts to “come and talk” with Him. He is the one who first seeks us, so that now our hearts seek Him in return. Those who don’t know the Lord may seek His hand, but those who have been born again, seek His face. They have heard the Lord speak as did Isaiah, “Come now, and let us reason together, saith the Lord: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool” (Isaiah 1:18).
 
PRAYER: Dear Father in Heaven, we seek your face today. Surely we have many needs and desires, but we set them aside now to come and talk with You. We want to know You more and more. Knowing that You are our portion and our delight. Our hearts are drawn to Thee and satisfied only in Your presence. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

“Since David called the Messiah ‘my Lord,’ how can the Messiah be his son?” (Matthew 22:45 NLT).

From: February 3, 2018

The Pharisees expected a Messiah to be born in the lineage of David that would overthrow Rome and restore Israel as a nation. They did not understand the prophecies that foretold the Messiah’s divinity. This was the point that Jesus wanted to make with them, that the Messiah would not only be in the lineage of David, but also the Son of God. He was trying to open their eyes to see that He was in fact, the Messiah, the son of David and the Son of God.
 
When the Pharisees asked Jesus a question, their motivation was usually to entrap (Matt. 22:35) or otherwise show Him to be in error. However, when Jesus asked them this question about the Messiah, His motive seems to be not to stump them, although that was the apparent outcome, but to reveal His true identity to them.

“Now therefore, if you will indeed obey My voice and keep My covenant, then you shall be a special treasure to Me above all people; for all the earth is Mine. And you shall be to Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation” (Exodus 19:5-6 NKJV).

From: February 3, 2017

God told Moses that the Israelites would be a “special treasure” to Him above other nations. The Hebrew word translated “special treasure,” comes from a root word that includes the idea that the treasure was special because it was purchased or redeemed at great cost to the owner. Israel was the Lord’s “special treasure,” not because of their own intrinsic value, but because He had chosen and redeemed them out of Egypt as on “eagle’s wings” (Ex. 19:4). It was the Lord’s own redemption that made Israel special. That the Lord had chosen them as His own peculiar possession did not mean that He didn’t care for the other nations of the earth. Not at all. For all the earth belongs to the Lord and all its people. He chose Israel for a special purpose, that they would be a “kingdom of priests and a holy nation.” Israel was set apart to testify of the Lord to all the other nations. Yet ultimately, Israel was chosen to be the people to whom the Lord Jesus would be born. Jesus is the One who fulfilled Israel’s purpose, obeying the Lord’s voice, keeping His covenant, and becoming the Great High Priest who offers salvation to all the world through His sacrifice.

“But Moses’ hands grew weary, so they took a stone and put it under him, and he sat on it, while Aaron and Hur held up his hands, one on one side, and the other on the other side. So his hands were steady until the going down of the sun. And Joshua overwhelmed Amalek and his people with the sword” (Exodus 17:12-13 ESV)

From: February 3, 2016

As long as Moses held his arms up, the Israelite army was winning, but when he tired and began to lower his arms, the battle went against them. This is the spiritual influence that God invests in a key leader, yet they remain human, subject to fatigue and discouragement like everyone else. Many churches today replace their tired leaders with fresh ones, thinking that will turn the battle their way. It usually doesn’t. The new leaders eventually wear out too. Aaron and Hur thought of a better solution. Why not help hold up their leader Moses’ arms? Why not give him some help without trying to steal his leadership? Humbly moving to help their leader turned the tide. There are at least a couple of leadership lessons here: 1) Leaders need to be humble enough to ask/allow others to help hold up their leadership arms. 2) Followers need to support their leaders through times of difficulty because when their leader succeeds, so do they.

“But he who is greatest among you shall be your servant” (Matthew 23:11 NKJV)

From: February 3, 2015

Jesus not only taught, but modeled the art of servant leadership. He showed that true greatness was not about exalting oneself, but being humble enough to wash another’s feet. This is the Kingdom leadership model that turns the world upside down. The servant leader descends to greatness. By choosing to serve, the Lord lifts him up.

“Moses’ arms soon became so tired he could no longer hold them up. So Aaron and Hur found a stone for him to sit on. Then they stood on each side of Moses, holding up his hands. So his hands held steady until sunset. As a result, Joshua overwhelmed the army of Amalek in battle” (Exodus 17:12-13)

From: February 3, 2014

As long as Moses held his arms up, the Israelite army was winning, but when he tired and began to lower his arms, the battle went against them. This is the spiritual influence that God invests in a key leader, yet they remain human, subject to fatigue and discouragement like everyone else. Many churches today replace their tired leaders with fresh ones, thinking that will turn the battle their way. It usually doesn’t. The new leaders eventually wear out too. Aaron and Hur thought of a better solution. Why not help hold up their leader Moses’ arms? Why not give him some help without trying to steal his leadership? Humbly moving to help their leader turned the tide. There are at least a couple of leadership lessons here: 1) Leaders need to be humble enough to ask/allow others to help hold up their leadership arms. 2) Followers need to support their leaders through times of difficulty because when their leader succeeds, so do they.

“Hear, O LORD, when I cry aloud; be gracious to me and answer me!” (Psalm 27:7)

From: February 3, 2013

Have you yet cried aloud to the Lord as David did? The Psalms teach us to seek the Lord regardless of our state. Every emotional status from joy to despair is represented in the Psalms. David, the man after God’s own heart, teaches us to seek God with all of our hearts. Perhaps David was experiencing a “dark night of the soul” as St. John of the Cross once wrote. God often allows a growing believer to experience a season of spiritual dryness to teach them to thirst after Him. David knew what to do when he was spiritually thirsty. Do you?

“Aaron and Hur held his hands up” (Exodus 17:12)

From: February 3, 2011

As long as Moses held up his hands to God, the Israelites were winning. But when Moses tired and lowered his hands, that battle went against them. Moses needed men to come alongside him to hold up his hands. Do you help hold up your leader’s (Pastor/CG leader/boss/parent/coach) hands or do you let him carry the load alone?