February 13

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“All whose hearts were stirred and whose spirits were moved came and brought their sacred offerings to the Lord. They brought all the materials needed for the Tabernacle, for the performance of its rituals, and for the sacred garments.” (Exodus 35:21 NLT).

From: February 13, 2019

EQUAL SACRIFICE, NOT EQUAL GIFTS

God is honored when His people worship Him with “stirred” hearts and “moved” spirits. The first has to do with the emotion and the other the will. One with a stirred heart is filled with passion for God’s kingdom work. They enthusiastically bring their offering of praise. One who is moved with a willing spirit serves God, not out of duty, but out of desire. They want to serve and give. God cares more for the condition of our heart in giving, than in the content of our gifts. Equal sacrifice, not equal gifts.
 
PRAYER: Dear Lord, we thank You for the gifts and blessing You have bestowed on us. We are forever grateful. We are stirred and moved to sacrificially give back to You in gratitude and worship. All that we are and all that we have are from You and belong to You. Help us to grow in our gratitude and generosity. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

“I will bless the Lord at all times; His praise shall continually be in my mouth” (Psalm 34:1 NKJV).

From: February 13, 2017

We say, “Bless you!” when someone sneezes, meaning “I wish you good health.” But what does it mean to “bless the Lord?” David answers this question for us, when he further stated, “His praise shall continually be in my mouth.” The word “praise” is a synonym for “bless,” which can also include the meaning, “to worship,” or “to glorify.”
 
The Jewish prayer before the breaking of bread at mealtime begins with this word, “bless” (“baruch”). However, rather than asking God to bless the food, their prayer blesses the Lord Himself for giving them bread. The prayer in Hebrew is: “Barukh atah Adonai Elohaynu melekh ha-olam ha-motzi lechem min ha-aretz. Amein.” (“Blessed art Thou O Lord, our God, King of the Universe who bringeth forth bread from the earth. Amen”).
 
In this psalm, David declared his intent not only to “bless” and “praise” the Lord, but to do it “continually” and “at all times.” In other words, he declared his resolve to bless the Lord not only when he had bread to eat, but also when he was hungry and no bread could be found. Or as Job said, “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return. The LORD gave, and the LORD has taken away; blessed be the name of the LORD” (Job 1:21).
 
What kind of day are you having today? Are you blessing the Lord in it regardless?

“Bezalel and Oholiab and every craftsman in whom the Lord has put skill and intelligence to know how to do any work in the construction of the sanctuary shall work in accordance with all that the Lord has commanded.” (Exodus 36:1 ESV)

From: February 13, 2016

The modern separation between the sacred and the secular is not the wholistic view of faith and vocation that is seen in the Bible. Consider these two men whom Moses named in the Exodus story because of their God-given talent as craftsmen. He described Bezalel as being “called by name” (Ex.35:30) by the Lord to work as the lead craftsman in building the tabernacle. Both he and Oholiab were similarly gifted by and called by God to do this highly skilled work. Moses even described Bezalel as being “filled with the Spirit” (Ex.35:31), not only to do all kinds of specialized work as a craftsman, but also as one whom God “inspired to teach” (Ex.35:34) others his craft.
All work is sacred when it is done as “unto the Lord” (Col.3:23).

“Then everyone came whose heart was stirred, and everyone whose spirit was willing, and they brought the Lord’s offering for the work of the tabernacle” (Exodus 35:21 NKJV)

From: February 13, 2015

God is honored when His people worship Him with “stirred” hearts and “willing” spirits. The first has to do with the emotion and the other the will. One with a stirred heart is filled with passion for God’s kingdom work. They enthusiastically bring their offering of praise. One with a willing spirit serves God, not out of duty, but out of desire. They want to serve and give. God cares more for the condition of our heart in giving, than in the content of our gifts.

“Jesus called out with a loud voice, ‘Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?’ which means ‘My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?’” (Matthew 27:46 NLT)

From: February 13, 2014

Between the four gospels, seven last sayings of Jesus are recorded. This is saying number six. Here, Jesus repeats David’s haunting words from Psalm 22:1. For the first time in eternity, fellowship between the Father and the Son is interrupted. Jesus who knew no sin, became our sin. Jesus who is the Life, took our death. Jesus the eternal Son of God, took our separation. So, we might receive His righteousness, life and sonship by believing in Him. What was Jesus’ seventh saying? “It is finished” (John 19:30). Jesus accomplished His mission for our salvation.

“I sought the LORD, and he answered me and delivered me from all my fears” (Psalm 34:4)

From: February 13, 2013

David wrote this psalm during the time he was hiding from Saul among the Philistines. Unfortunately, when we come up with human schemes to avoid trouble we often jump from the frying pan into the fire. Yet, it is never too late to cry out to God for help. David was delivered from his fears. We can bring our fears to God too. He will hear us and answer.