April 25

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‘But Jesus said, “No more of this.” And he touched the man’s ear and healed him.’ (Luke 22:51 NLT).

From: April 25, 2018

WHAT BECAME OF THE LAST MAN TOUCHED BY JESUS?
The last man that received the healing touch of Jesus was one of the men that came to arrest him in the Garden of Gethsemene. According to John, the man’s name was “Malchus” (John 18:10), a servant of the high priest, and it was Simon Peter who cut off his ear with a sword. Even so, Jesus healed the man’s ear with a touch. Many had felt the healing touch of Jesus throughout His years of ministry, but Malchus was the last.
 
I wonder. What became of Malchus? Did John mention him by name because he later became a follower of Jesus? Did Malchus tell the story of how Jesus had healed him even though he had come as an enemy? Did he remember the gentle and healing touch of Jesus every time he scratched his ear? Did he who arrested Jesus become arrested by Christ’s love instead?

“When leaders lead in Israel, When the people willingly offer themselves, Bless the Lord!” (Judges 5:2 NKJV).

From: April 25, 2017

This is the first verse of the duet sung by Deborah and Barak after the defeat of the Canaanite army. Deborah was a judge and a prophetess in Israel and Barak was the leader of the troops from the tribes of Naphtali and Zebulun. This first verse seems to have been sung by Deborah, blessing the Lord for Barak’s willingness to lead and the people’s willingness to follow him into battle.
 
Deborah described three important ingredients for their success in this verse that are worthy of consideration:
1) The Lord’s willingness to bless.
2) The leader’s willingness to lead.
3) The people’s willingness to serve and follow.
 
These three important ingredients for success are still true today for a family, a church or a nation. The Lord blesses when leaders are willing to lead and people are willing to serve according to the Lord’s instruction.

“For I tell you that this Scripture must be fulfilled in me: ‘And he was numbered with the transgressors.’ For what is written about me has its fulfillment.” (Luke 22:37 ESV)

From: April 25, 2016

On the night He was betrayed, Jesus quoted the Messianic prophecy of Isaiah 53:12 to prepare the disciples for His crucifixion. He who knew no sin, would be “numbered” or counted among the sinners. And He would allow this accounting to take place willingly, so that those who believed in Him might be numbered among the righteous.

“Why do you sleep? Rise and pray, lest you enter into temptation” (Luke 22:46 NKJV)

From: April 25, 2015

While Jesus was praying in the Garden of Gethsemane, the disciples fell asleep. He had told them to watch and pray while He pulled away to pray alone. But they were exhausted with “sorrow” (v.45). Jesus was trying to prepare them for a difficult trial, but their human frailty was too much. I wonder how many times the Spirit of Christ urges us to pray, yet our flesh is too weak? Instead, we sleep. Christ followers still hear the Spirit say, “Rise and pray.” Rise up from your sleep and lift your heartfelt prayers to the Father. There is a rest that comes from prayer that is better than that from sleep.

“Father, if you are willing, please take this cup of suffering away from me. Yet I want your will to be done, not mine” (Luke 22:42 NLT)

From: April 25, 2014

Both the humanity and divinity of Jesus are seen in this prayer. His humanity in his desire to avoid suffering and death. His divinity in his obedience to the Father to lay down his life for our sin. That Jesus is both Son of God and Son of Man is seen, but also a new way of praying. Praying like Jesus, we not only express our desires to God, but we invite God to realign our will with His. We pray like Jesus when we pray, “Not my will, but Yours be done” prayers.

“Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me. Nevertheless, not my will, but yours, be done” (Luke 22:42 ESV)

From: April 25, 2013

Both the humanity and divinity of Jesus are seen in this prayer. His humanity in his desire to avoid suffering and death. His divinity in his obedience to the Father to lay down his life for our sin. That Jesus is both Son of God and Son of Man is seen, but also a new way of praying. Praying like Jesus, we not only express our desires to God, but we invite God to realign our will with His.