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April 19

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“But as he came closer to Jerusalem and saw the city ahead, he began to weep” (Luke 19:41 NLT).

From: April 19, 2018

JESUS WEEPS OVER JERUSALEM
When Jesus looked at Jerusalem, it wasn’t the palm branch waving crowd nor the beauty of Mt. Zion that drew His attention. For He saw it not only with physical eyes but with prophetic vision. He knew the time had come for Daniel’s prophecy to be fulfilled. As Daniel wrote, “Messiah shall be cut off, the city and the Sanctuary destroyed, and desolations decreed” (Dan. 9:26). Jesus didn’t weep for Himself. He wept that His people didn’t recognize the time of God’s visitation.

“Hope deferred makes the heart sick, But when the desire comes, it is a tree of life” (Proverbs 13:12 NKJV).

From: April 19, 2017

Having to wait for any expected good certainly affects our attitude. In this sense, the writer of this proverb accurately observed the growing despondency of the heart that waits unfulfilled. Yet, it is even more intense in the spiritual longing that we have for God. It was in this spiritual sense that many see this proverb pointing to Israel’s longing for the coming of the Desired One, the Messiah. As the Lord spoke through the prophet Haggai, “I will shake all nations, and they shall come to the Desire of All Nations, and I will fill this temple with glory,’ says the Lord of hosts” (Haggai 2:7).
 
Today, we experience a kind of “heart sickness” as we await the return of Christ. But we have the Holy Spirit which fills us with a confident hope that assures us of the certainty of our desire. As the apostle Paul wrote, “Now hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out in our hearts by the Holy Spirit who was given to us” (Rom. 5:5).

“Will You work wonders for the dead? Shall the dead arise and praise You?” (Psalm 88:10 NKJV)

From: April 19, 2015

According to the inscription, this psalm was written by Heman, one of the sons of Korah, and possibly the grandson of the prophet Samuel (1 Chron. 6:14). Most commentators consider this the most melancholy of all the psalms, yet within this psalm of lamentation, there is a positive question: “Shall the dead arise?” Cried out in prayerful lament, the question clearly begs the response: Yes! The Lord will “work wonders for the dead!” God will raise the dead. The psalmist was full of despair and faced imminent death, yet he hoped for a resurrection. His hope was a future hope, in a time before the Christ had come and risen from the grave. However, our hope is a hope made more certain, anchored in the reality of Christ’s resurrection and return. We may cry out to God in lamentation in this life, but we do not grieve as those who have no hope (1 Thess. 4:13). For our hope is in the Risen Lord.

“But as he came closer to Jerusalem and saw the city ahead, he began to weep” (Luke 19:41 NLT)

From: April 19, 2014

Jesus knew the future of Jerusalem. He knew that the Romans would destroy it, not leaving one stone upon another. This destruction happened in 70 AD, within the lifetimes of many that heard His prediction. That Jesus knew the future with such certainty points to His divinity. That He wept over Jerusalem shows His humanity. Jesus is both God and man, even His judgments are marked by tears.

“And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it” (Luke 19:41 ESV)

From: April 19, 2013

Jesus knew the future of Jerusalem. He knew that the Romans would destroy it, not leaving one stone upon another. This destruction happened in 70 AD, within the lifetimes of many that heard His prediction. That Jesus knew the future with such certainty shows His divinity. That He wept over Jerusalem shows His humanity. Jesus is both God and man, full of truth and grace. Even His judgments are marked by tears.

“So they went and found the colt, just as Jesus had said. And sure enough, as they were untying it, the owners asked them, “Why are you untying that colt?” And the disciples simply replied, “The Lord needs it.” (Luke 19:32-34)

From: April 19, 2012

If the Lord needed your never ridden donkey, would you let Him use it? Or would you suggest the old broken-in one? Or perhaps that He come by at a more convenient time? Or that …

“The leaders among the people were trying to kill him. Yet they could not find any way to do it, because all the people hung on his words (Luke 19:47-48)

From: April 19, 2011

Tuesday of Passion Week Jesus spent teaching in the temple. His words caused some to desire His death and others to receive His life. Do you “hang” on His words?