Luke 19

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Recognizing Christ’s Visitation

April 14, 2019 | Luke 19:28-44 | palm Sunday

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When Jesus visited Jerusalem on that day, it was the first day of Passover Week. Great numbers of Jews had traveled from all over the Roman Empire to celebrate this annual Jewish festival. A great crowd greeted Jesus as he entered Jerusalem responding to him with chanting, throwing their cloaks on the ground before him and waving of palm branches. They greeted him in a manner befitting a king, but before the week was out, the crowd would curse him as a criminal.
Jesus called his visit to Jerusalem that day a “visitation.” In the Greek, it has the sense of a formal visit or inspection by a dignitary. In English, the word “visitation” has the same meaning. On Palm Sunday we remember the visitation of the Son of God to Jerusalem.

In the gospel according to Luke, Jesus expressed His desire that the people of Jerusalem would have recognized His visitation to them as the Messiah, the Christ, the Son of God. We can recognize Christ’s visitation to us.

“But as he came closer to Jerusalem and saw the city ahead, he began to weep” (Luke 19:41 NLT).

April 19, 2018

JESUS WEEPS OVER JERUSALEM
When Jesus looked at Jerusalem, it wasn’t the palm branch waving crowd nor the beauty of Mt. Zion that drew His attention. For He saw it not only with physical eyes but with prophetic vision. He knew the time had come for Daniel’s prophecy to be fulfilled. As Daniel wrote, “Messiah shall be cut off, the city and the Sanctuary destroyed, and desolations decreed” (Dan. 9:26). Jesus didn’t weep for Himself. He wept that His people didn’t recognize the time of God’s visitation.

“And Jesus said to him, ‘Today salvation has come to this house'” (Luke 19:9 NKJV)

April 18, 2015

After Jesus visited Zacchaeus’ house, the short man stood and declared his intent to give away half of his wealth to the poor. This was not a confession of faith, but an evidence of heart change. Zacchaeus had already received Jesus into his house. And this was the result: Riches no longer held his heart, Christ did. Christ Himself was the Salvation that had come to his house. The gospel still moves from house to house. Has Salvation come to your house yet?

“But as he came closer to Jerusalem and saw the city ahead, he began to weep” (Luke 19:41 NLT)

April 19, 2014

Jesus knew the future of Jerusalem. He knew that the Romans would destroy it, not leaving one stone upon another. This destruction happened in 70 AD, within the lifetimes of many that heard His prediction. That Jesus knew the future with such certainty points to His divinity. That He wept over Jerusalem shows His humanity. Jesus is both God and man, even His judgments are marked by tears.

“For the Son of Man came to seek and save those who are lost” (Luke 19:10 NLT)

April 18, 2014

The people all had their own ideas about why the Messiah would come and what he would accomplish. But none were ready for his true mission: “to seek and save” the lost. Jesus described himself with the Messianic title “Son of Man” while explaining his purpose. On his way up to Jerusalem, to be crucified for our sins, he stopped in Jericho to eat at a tax collector’s house named, Zacchaeus. There the rich, little, tree climbing man confessed his sins to Jesus. And Jesus continued up to Jerusalem and to the cross, and carried Zacchaeus’ sins, and our sins, there with him.

“And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it” (Luke 19:41 ESV)

April 19, 2013

Jesus knew the future of Jerusalem. He knew that the Romans would destroy it, not leaving one stone upon another. This destruction happened in 70 AD, within the lifetimes of many that heard His prediction. That Jesus knew the future with such certainty shows His divinity. That He wept over Jerusalem shows His humanity. Jesus is both God and man, full of truth and grace. Even His judgments are marked by tears.

“I must stay at your house today” (Luke 19:5)

April 18, 2011

What Jesus said to Zacchaeus, He still says to us. Is He a welcome guest at your house? A frequent visitor? Or does He “stay” at your house, abiding with you and you with Him?