Luke 1

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“And you, my little son, will be called the prophet of the Most High, because you will prepare the way for the Lord” (Luke 1:76 NLT).

March 15, 2018

FROM MUTE DONKEY TO ARTICULATE PROPHET
In today’s OT reading, the Lord opened the mouth of Balaam’s donkey to speak. And in the NT reading, the Lord made Zechariah mute for nine months before restoring his voice. Zechariah praised God and prophesied over his newborn son, John. All that the angel Gabriel predicted had come to pass. I suppose he had plenty of time to contemplate the angel’s words, since he had no words of his own during his wife’s pregnancy. Awe fell over the entire neighborhood as the tongue-tied priest became an articulate prophet, blessing his son. What if every child was so anticipated? What if every child had a father speaking such prophetic blessing over him?

God asked Moses, “Who gave man his mouth?” (Ex. 4:11). The Lord can make a faithless man mute or a speechless donkey talk. So, we must be careful concerning our speech.

Mary: A Willing Faith

May 22, 2016 | Luke 1:26-38 | character study, faith

In the book of Luke, God spoke through the angel Gabriel to Mary to announce that she would give birth to a son who would be the Messiah, the Son of God. Mary willingly received and believed God’s Word. She became a willing vessel of God’s Word. We can have a faith like Mary’s that willing receives and believes God’s Word.

“Behold, I am the servant of the Lord; let it be to me according to your word” (Luke 1:38 ESV)

March 14, 2016

Mary’s response to the angel Gabriel that she would bear the Christ child was a wonderful expression of submission to God’s will. Her faithful response stands in contrast to Zechariah’s doubtful one. Of course, Mary questioned the angel too, but her request was not for certification, but for clarification. Zachariah wanted proof that his barren wife would have a child. Mary wanted to understand the means of conception since she was a virgin. She asked for clarification, not confirmation. Mary’s response stemmed from her faith; Zachariah’s stemmed from his lack of faith.

“And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Highest; For you will go before the face of the Lord to prepare His ways” (Luke 1:76 NKJV)

March 15, 2015

After nine months being mute, Zacharias prophesied over his newborn son, John. All that the angel Gabriel predicted had come to pass. I suppose the silenced old Zacharias had plenty of time to contemplate the angel’s words during his wife’s pregnancy. Awe fell over the entire neighborhood as the tongue-tied priest became an articulate prophet, blessing his son. In this verse, he spoke the prophecy of Malachi 3:1 over his son, saying that he would be the preparer of the way for the Messiah. What if every child was so anticipated? What if every son had a father speaking a prophetic blessing over him?

“it seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first, to write to you an orderly account, most excellent Theophilus” (Luke 1:3 NKJV)

March 13, 2015

Luke addressed both his gospel as well as the book of Acts to a man named “Theophilus,” whose name means “lover of God.” Luke addressed him with the title, “most excellent,” which would imply that he was a person of prominence. Some have suggested that Theophilus was a man of wealth and position that Luke had been discipling in the faith. Perhaps he had offered to underwrite the expense of publishing Luke’s gospel and the book of Acts as well, which means that Luke addressed both of these books to him as his patron. The cost of copying these two works, so that they could be shared among the churches would have been great. There was no printing press, so the cost of copyists and paper was very high. At any rate, Luke the physician, under the inspiration of the Spirit, offered a very well-researched and “orderly account” of the gospel of Jesus and the history of the early church. And we are able to hold this account in our hands and read it with our eyes and receive it into our hearts today!

“And you, my little son, will be called the prophet of the Most High, because you will prepare the way for the Lord” (Luke 1:76 NLT)

March 15, 2014

After 9 months being mute, Zechariah prophesied over his newborn son, John. All that the angel Gabriel predicted had come to pass. I suppose he had plenty of time to contemplate the angel’s words during his wife’s pregnancy. Awe fell over the entire neighborhood as the tongue-tied priest became an articulate prophet, blessing his son. What if every child was so anticipated? What if every son had a father speaking such prophetic blessing over him?

“Then the angel said, ‘I am Gabriel! I stand in the very presence of God. It was he who sent me to bring you this good news!'” (Luke 1:19 NLT)

March 13, 2014

The angel that appeared to Zechariah in the temple and foretold the birth of John the Baptist was no common messenger. He was Gabriel, one of the angelic host that continuously stood in the very presence of God. He did not appreciate the doubtful questioning of old Zechariah. He identified himself, delivered the divine message, and stilled Zechariah’s doubting tongue until it could speak faithfully again. Perhaps Gabriel was surprised by Zechariah’s unbelief since they both had similar jobs. For while Gabriel stood before God’s heavenly throne, Zechariah stood burning incense before God’s presence in His earthly Temple. Yet, there was a curtain in the Temple separating Zechariah from the Holy of Holies, while Gabriel stood in the burning presence of God’s very throne. When Jesus died on the cross, that curtain was torn, so that those who believe on Him may boldly approach God’s throne with all our requests.

“And he asked for a writing tablet and wrote, ‘His name is John.'” (Luke 1:63 ESV)

March 15, 2013

Against family tradition, but in accordance with the Lord’s instruction, Zechariah named his son John. The boy grew and became known as John the Baptist, the forerunner of the Christ. When Zechariah wrote the name, no doubt he wrote it in Hebrew: יוֹחָנָן (Yôḥanan), which means “Graced by Yahweh.” Since the New Testament is written in Greek, his name appeared as: Ἰωάννης (Iōánnēs) in Luke’s text. In English, the name “John” is derived from this Hebrew/Greek lineage and has become the most common masculine name in the Western world. According to Jesus, John was the greatest ever born up until that time. He truly lived up to his name, as the angel Gabriel had predicted. He was great before the Lord.