2 Kings

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“Now it came to pass in the thirty-seventh year of the captivity of Jehoiachin king of Judah, in the twelfth month, on the twenty-seventh day of the month, that Evil-Merodach king of Babylon, in the year that he began to reign, released Jehoiachin king of Judah from prison” (2 Kings 25:27 NKJV).

July 4, 2017

After a long and depressing description of Judah’s decline and ultimate fall, the author of 2 Kings offered a glimmer of hope. After thirty-seven years in prison, the deposed king of Judah, Jehoiachin, was released and given a royal pension to live on the rest of his days by Evil-Merodach, son of Nebuchadnezzar. Thus, by God’s grace the seed of David was preserved.

“In his days Pharaoh Necho king of Egypt went to the aid of the king of Assyria, to the River Euphrates; and King Josiah went against him. And Pharaoh Necho killed him at Megiddo when he confronted him” (2 Kings 23:29 NKJV).

July 3, 2017

King Josiah was the last of the good kings in Judah. It was written of him that there was no king like him, neither before or after, who turned to the Lord with all his heart, soul and might. Yet, the brief description of his death in battle sadly does not include any reference to… Read more »

“For the children of Israel walked in all the sins of Jeroboam which he did; they did not depart from them, until the Lord removed Israel out of His sight, as He had said by all His servants the prophets. So Israel was carried away from their own land to Assyria, as it is to this day” (2 Kings 17:22-23 NKJV).

June 30, 2017

The destruction of the Northern Kingdom of Israel was now complete. They had rejected David’s son as king, followed Jeroboam into idolatry, ignored the warnings of the prophets, so that the Lord allowed Assyria to conquer them and carry them away. Their demise is the basis for the search for the “Ten Lost Tribes.” However, such a search seems fruitless, as the Bible describes them as having intermarried with the Assyrians, so that their genealogy was lost. Yet, the tribe of Judah remained. Although along with it, much of the tribe of Benjamin, and the tribes of Simeon and Levi also remained, yet were incorporated into Judah, so that all were known as “Jews” from that point until now.

Later, Judah was also carried away by the Babylonians, but unlike the tribes of Israel, Judah did not intermarry and remained faithful to the Lord in exile. So, when they returned to Jerusalem after 70 years they were able to reinstitute Temple worship and retain their Jewish identity.

The destruction and disappearance of the Northern tribes came as a result of their rejection of the Lord as their God. Yet, the Lord patiently sent them His prophets to warn them and gave them time to repent. But they did not. Even so, the Lord has sent Jesus Christ to all nations, so that even the so-called “lost tribes” might be “found” in Him.

“The rest of the deeds of Hezekiah and all his might and how he made the pool and the conduit and brought water into the city, are they not written in the Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Judah?” (2 Kings 20:20 ESV)

July 2, 2016

King Hezekiah was one of the greatest kings in Judah. In 2 Kings 18:5, he was described as one who “trusted in the Lord God of Israel, so that after him was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor who were before him.” The only foolish event attributed to his reign happened near its end, as he invited emissaries from Babylon to see all of the wealth within Jerusalem, thus foreshadowing Babylon’s future overthrow of the city. Yet, despite this prideful lapse in judgment, Hezekiah remains one of the greatest kings to sit on David’s throne. Evidence of his reign still remains today, as the water still flows through Hezekiah’s tunnel into Jerusalem. My wife, Robin and I have waded through this manmade tunnel which attests to ancient man’s genius and to the credibility of the Bible which describes its existence.

“Hezekiah received the letter from the hand of the messengers and read it; and Hezekiah went up to the house of the Lord and spread it before the Lord” (2 Kings 19:14 ESV)

July 1, 2016

When King Hezekiah of Judah received a letter from the king of Assyria threatening to overthrow Jerusalem and mocking his dependence on the Lord, the king carried the letter into the Temple. He fell on his face in prayer and spread the letter out on the floor for the Lord’s consideration. The Lord heard Hezekiah’s prayer and defended Jerusalem, so that the Assyrian army retreated without firing a shot. What threatens you today? Have you “spread” it out before the Lord in prayer?

“Now it happened, when the king heard the words of the Book of the Law, that he tore his clothes” (2 Kings 22:11 NKJV)

July 3, 2015

King Josiah was crowned at age eight after his father, Amon, was murdered by conspirators. Both his father and his grandfather, Manasseh, were evil kings who had led the people into idolatry. Apparently, during the 55-year reign of Manasseh, the Book of the Law had been lost. How this came to be is not explained, but it was found in the Temple by the high priest when Josiah commissioned him to collect money for Temple repairs. When the Book was brought before Josiah and read to him, he tore his clothes in repentance. After inquiring of the Lord concerning His Word, Josiah cleaned house and publicly made a covenant with the Lord to keep His commands. According to 2 Kings 23:25 “before him there was no king like him, who turned to the Lord with all his heart, with all his soul, and with all his might, according to all the Law of Moses; nor after him did any arise like him.”
If only our government would rediscover the law of God…

“Now the rest of the acts of Hezekiah—all his might, and how he made a pool and a tunnel and brought water into the city—are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah?” (2 Kings 20:20 NKJV)

July 2, 2015

King Hezekiah was one of the greatest kings in Judah. In 2 Kings 18:5, he was described as one who “trusted in the Lord God of Israel, so that after him was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor who were before him.” The only foolish event attributed to his reign happened near its end, as he invited emissaries from Babylon to see all of the wealth within Jerusalem, thus foreshadowing Babylon’s future overthrow of the city. Yet, despite this prideful lapse in judgment, Hezekiah remains one of the greatest kings to sit on David’s throne. Evidence of his reign still remains today, as the water still flows through Hezekiah’s tunnel into Jerusalem. My wife, Robin and I have waded through this manmade tunnel which attests to ancient man’s genius and to the credibility of the Bible which describes its existence.

“For I will defend this city, to save it for My own sake and for My servant David’s sake” (2 Kings 19:34 NKJV)

July 1, 2015

After the Assyrians had overthrown the Northern Kingdom of Israel, they set their sights on the Southern Kingdom of Judah. But as their armies gathered outside the city of Jerusalem, they overplayed their hand by belittling the name of God in their threats. So, God heard the prayer of King Hezekiah of Judah and delivered Jerusalem untouched from Assyrian hands. God did this for the sake of His own Name and for the sake of the remnant within Jerusalem who still honored Him.
Is there a remnant who still honor God’s Name in your city today?

“After Hezekiah received the letter from the messengers and read it, he went up to the Lord’s Temple and spread it out before the Lord” (2 Kings 19:14 NLT)

July 1, 2014

When King Hezekiah of Judah received a letter from the king of Assyria threatening to overthrow Jerusalem and mocking his dependence on the Lord, the king carried the letter into the Temple. He fell on his face in prayer and spread the letter out on the floor for the Lord’s consideration. The Lord heard Hezekiah’s prayer and defended Jerusalem, so that the Assyrian army retreated without firing a shot. What threatens you today? Have you “spread” it out before the Lord in prayer?

But his officers tried to reason with him and said, “Sir, if the prophet had told you to do something very difficult, wouldn’t you have done it? So you should certainly obey him when he says simply, ‘Go and wash and be cured!’” (2 Kings 5:13 NLT)

June 23, 2014

Simple instructions… The Uganda mission team is home again. Yet, I can still hear Blake teaching the “simple instructions” of salvation through the lesson of Naaman. Children and adults alike in Uganda freely responded. What a great surprise to return to the world of reliable internet and see this OYB reading today. Naaman had to surrender his pride and “go and wash” in the Jordan to be healed of leprosy. Jesus gave us simple instructions too in order to be saved. “Believe on the One whom God has sent” (John 6:29).